An address, delivered before the Law academy of Philadelphia, at the opening of the session of 1833-34

Front Cover
Printed by T. Kite & co., 1833 - Law - 15 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - ... enhanced, and the law kept pure, by exposure to a broad, wholesome at mosphere. We have already dispensed, through the medium, sometimes, of silent di-use, or by force of circumstances and situation, and often through legislative interferenre.with those portions of English law, which, in that country, make the market, and the occasion for that sheer technical merit, which consists in capacity to thread the intricacies of mere formula, or to grope the utter darkness of a family settlement. Our...
Page 6 - Since the track was made, our profession has enlarged its sphere, and a course of 6 study which may have assorted with the profession as it used to be, is now inappropriate. The lawyers who succeeded in the days just gone, and those who succeed in our own, owe their fortune to more liberal and less technical means, than those which raised to eminence the men of earlier date. The creed which held that a lawyer must be only a delver in law, has ceased to be orthodox, and middle ground is assumed between...
Page 8 - ... and bar eloquence of the lawyer, did not consist with the views of the statesman, and the nobler oratory of the Senate. The numerous instances in which reputations of eminent lawyers had been tarnished, by failures in the legislative halls, seemed to justify the censure. But of late years, there has been no room for it. The most rising public man in England is a lawyer, whose first steps towards the great eminence he has attained, were made at the bar; and it may be asserted, without more liability...
Page 6 - ... the least popular and the most unimportant. Success here is in the gift of the many ; and its highest places are not to be won by mere technical proficiency, however great, or without that general and more liberalised merit which all can appreciate. This excursive temper is natural to our condition.
Page 7 - The legal bigotry which prompted the rebuke, sai<l to have been bestowed, hy an English judge upon the young barrister, who transformed his p'ea of tout temps prist from its original barbarism of Anglo-Norman accent, into the more intelligible graces of modern French, bidding him
Page 5 - ... law — an institution which should carry out into the fulness of which it is capable, the plan of instruc tion of which the Academy is an imperfect sketch. — Why should the formation of youth for the profession of the law — one whose importance is surely not undervalued, which chiefly supples the republic with statesmen and legislators, and fills the high office of vindicating the rights of the citizen, and upholding the laws of the land — be limited to the perusal of a few elementary...
Page 6 - ... however great, or without that general and more liberalised merit which all can appreciate. This excursive temper is natural to our condition, ""'he spirit which carries the cobler beyond his last, is the genuine offspring of his right of suffrage; a disposition that awaits upon...
Page 4 - Academus, and the immortal glories of the Pantheon. For you there is no such chilling entertainment. The rigours of your apprenticeship are forgotten, its speculative sameness coloured and diversified by the exercises of the Academy. The monotony of the closet is varied with a rehearsal of the ardent encounters of the Bar.
Page 5 - How inadequate, for example, the preparation fur a prnfes-ion — whose most important department is public speaking — which is begun, continued and ended, without any manner of reference to that essential particular. This confined path of study is less adapted to modern purposes than it wa- to those of our fathers who laid it out, and in...
Page 4 - It begets in the student, what the most attentive perusal of the sages of the law seldom gives birth to, a taste for the profession, filling him with that ardent devotion to it, which the native...

Bibliographic information