An address, written by Mr. Clerc: and read by his request at a public examination of the pupils in the Connecticut Asylum before the governour and both houses of the legislature, 28th May, 1818

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Hudson and Co., 1818 - Deaf - 14 pages
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Page 10 - Colleges, and asking them the time required to put a pupil in a state to understand fully the Greek and Latin authors, and to write their thoughts in either of these languages, so as to make them understood by those who would speak these languages, then you would agree with me that the Greek or Latin would not be more difficult to be taught to the Deaf and Dumb, than the English; and yet to teach the Greek and Latin in colleges, the professors and pupils have, for a means of comparison, a language...
Page 3 - A lady, whose name I do not recollect, lived in Paris, and had among her children two daughters, both deaf and -dumb. The Father Famin, one of the members of the society of Christian Doctrine, was acquainted with the family, and attempted, without method, to supply in those unfortunate persons the want of hearing and speech ; but was surprised by a premature death, before he could attain any degree of success. The two sisters, as well as their mother, were inconsolable at that loss, when by divine...
Page 10 - This career is that which a man, gifted with all his senses, and who is to be instructed, ought alike to run. The arts and sciences belong to the class of physical or intellectual objects; and the deaf and dumb, like men gifted with all their senses, may penetrate them according to the degree of intelligence which nature has granted them, as soon as they have reached the degree of instruction which Mr. Sicard's system of teaching embraces and affords. Now, ladies and gentlemen, if you will take the...
Page 7 - ... following the uninterrupted line from the known to the unknown. It was thus that he succeeded in making them comprehend the language of the country in which he instructed them. This natural method is applicable to all languages. It proceeds by the surest and shortest way, and may be applied to all the channels of communication between one man and another. It is by this method that Mr. Sicard has brought the deaf and dumb to the knowledge of all the kinds of words, of which a language is composed,...
Page 4 - Was abroad, and while he wai waiting for her, he wished to enter into conversation with the young ladies ; but their eyes remained fixed on their needle, and they gave no answer. In vain did he renew his questions, in vain did he redouble the sound of his voice, they were still silent, and durst hardly raise their heads to look at him. He did not know that those whom he thus addressed, were doomed by nature never to hear or speak. He already began to think them impolite and uncivil, and rose to go...
Page 5 - I have seen one or two (leaf and dumb fathers, some of whose children are deaf and dumb like themselves. Will this prove that the Americans are worse than Europeans ? By no means. It is the result of natural causes, which I shall explain hereafter.) Many others of the Deaf and Dumb are the instructors of their companions of misfortune. Many others are employed in the offices of government and other public administrations. Many others are good painters, sculptors, engravers, workers in Mosaic, while...
Page 4 - L'Epee, formerly belonging to the above mentioned society, had an opportunity of calling at their house. The mother was abroad, and while he was waiting for her, he wished to enter into conversation with the young ladies; but their eyes remained fixed on their needle, and they gave no answer. In vain did he renew his questions, in vain did he redouble the sound of his voice; they were still silent, and durst hardly raise their heads to look at him.
Page 9 - ... the regularity of the march of the sun and all the celestial bodies ; the constant succession of day and night ; the return of the seasons ; the life, the riches and the beauty of nature ; made them feel that nature also had a soul, of which the power, the action, and the immensity, extend through every thing existing in the universe ja soul which creates all, inspires all, and preserves all.
Page 3 - LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, THE kind concern which you were pleased to take in our public exhibition of last year, and the wish which you have had the goodness to express, to see it renewed, have induced me to comply with the request of the Directors of the Asylum, to deliver this address. I at first intended to write two or three...
Page 4 - Abb6 sympathized with her on the affliction and withdrew, full of the thought of taking the place of Father Famin. The first conception of a great man is usually a fruitful germ. Well acquainted with the Fr.ench grammar, he knew that every language was a collection of signs, as a series of drawings is...

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