An Amateur Angler's Days in Dove Dale: Or, How I Spent My Three Weeks' Holiday. (July 24-Aug. 14, 1884.) ...

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S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1888 - Dove Dale (England) - 88 pages
 

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Page 14 - GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but...
Page 28 - I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling ; And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel ; And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever.
Page 64 - I dare venture to assure you, 'tis a Grayling, who is one of the deadest-hearted fishes in the world, and the bigger he is, the more easily taken. Look you, now you see him plain; I told you what he was; bring hither that landing-net, Boy; and now. Sir, he is your own; and believe me a good one, sixteen inches long I warrant him; I have taken none such this year.
Page 19 - ... boast, as the Spaniards do of their river Anus, that they feed divers flocks of sheep upon a bridge. And lastly, for I would not tire your patience, one of no less authority than Josephus, that learned Jew, tells us of a river in Judea that runs swiftly all the six days of the week, and stands still and rests all their sabbath.
Page 88 - Sir, doubt not but that angling is an art; is it not an art to deceive a Trout with an artificial Fly? a Trout! that is more sharp-sighted than any Hawk you have named, and more watchful and timorous than your high-mettled Merlin is bold u ; and yet, I doubt not to catch a brace or two to-morrow, for a friend's breakfast; doubt not, therefore, Sir, but that angling is an art, and an art worth your learning.
Page 88 - ... you have named, and more watchful and timorous than your high-mettled merlin is bold ! and yet I doubt not to catch a brace or two to-morrow for a friend's breakfast. Doubt not, therefore, sir, but that angling is an art, and an art worth your learning ; the question is rather, whether you be capable of learning it ? for angling is somewhat like poetry, men are to be born so...
Page 64 - But what have we got here ? A rock springing up in the middle of the river ! this is one of the oddest sights that ever I saw.

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