An Answer to a Popish Book: Intituled, A True and Modest Account of the Chief Points in Controversie, Between the Roman Catholicks and the Protestants. Together with Some Considerations Upon the Sermons of a Divine of the Church of England. By |. ..., Issue 3

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W. Hawes, 1706 - 224 pages
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Page 199 - According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise master-builder I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon. For other foundation can no man lay, than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
Page 89 - Wherefore, whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.
Page 94 - took bread, and blefled it, and brake it, and gave it to the dif" ciples, and faid, Take, eat ; this is my body. And he took the " cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, faying, Drink ye " all of it> : for this is my blood of the new teftament, which is " fhed for many for the remiffion of fins.
Page 54 - And if he will not hear them, tell the Church. And if he will not hear the Church, let him be to thee as the heathen and publican.
Page 63 - Now tho' he set never so bold a face upon the matter and tell me with all the gravity and authority in the world, that it is not the sea but dry land under the species and appearance of water, and that whatever my eyes tell me, having once committed myself to his guidance, I must not trust my own...
Page 64 - I must not trust my own senses in the case, it being one of the dangerous sorts of infidelity for a man to believe his own eyes rather than his faithful and infallible guide. All this moves me not, but I begin to expostulate roundly with him and to let him understand that if I...
Page 208 - For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened.
Page 64 - I stand stiffly upon the shore and leave my learned and reverend guide to take his own course, and to dispose of himself as he pleases; but firmly resolve not to follow him.
Page 197 - Agree with thine adverfary quickly, whiles thou art in the way with him •, left at any time the adverfary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be caft into prilbn.
Page 63 - Country there should be no highways from one part of it to another: Yet thus far I submit to him, though not without some regret and impatience. But then if after this, for two or three days more he lead me directly South, and with my Face full upon the Sun at noonday, and at last bring me back again to Dover...

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