An Appeal to the Earl Bathurst, when Colonial Minister, on the Unconstitutional Continuance of Foreign Laws in the Colonies Ceded to Great Britain: With a Preface on the Direful Revolution Projected in England, and Excited in the British Antilles, by the Advocates of Negro-mania. Addressed to Field Marshal, His Grace the Duke of Wellington, K.G. &c. &c. &c

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Sams and Richardson, 1828 - Great Britain - 39 pages
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Page xxiv - ... all persons inhabiting in, or resorting to, our said colonies, may confide in our royal protection for the enjoyment of the benefit of the laws of our realm of England...
Page vi - ... that is so highly esteemed and accounted of in law, that was against law or inconvenient ; or that anything should passe from the king any wayes which he intended not, by any undue or surreptitious warrants.
Page xxv - North-America," they are deprived of the habeas corpus act and trial by juries, " are subjected to arbitrary fines and imprisomment, and liable to be tried both in " civil cases and matters of a criminal nature, not by known and permanent laws, but " by ordinances and edicts which the governour and council are...
Page 21 - Ga/ette, an address to the planters, which was hailed by them with general acclamation, and which contained, among much of the same tenor, the following remarkable passages. " I will venture to state it as my humble opinion, that the authority of the master over his negroes, being constantly employed in minute details, and being in its nature prompt and of hourly application, is not to be encumbered with official formalities. The sudden exercise of it is indispensably necessary to keep them to obedience...
Page xiii - Under the same title, B, 6, it is laid down generally, that the grant of an office to one who has another office incompatible is not good ; for the first office will thereby be void...
Page xxiii - Wales; in which the English law is the only law that has been allowed for more than two hundred years past : and the like good effects have followed from it. And in the last century, upon the conquest of the province of New-York...
Page 21 - It is a power to be exercised by the proprietor as sole chief and magistrate." " It would become utterly impracticable to check and restrain the disorders which -would ripen into serious evils, if masters were not armed with a powerful coercive force suddenly to apply the remedy. His power cannot without danger be brought into doubt or discussion. It should NEVER be opposed or...
Page xix - Relations dear, and all the charities " Of father, son, and brother...
Page xiii - If two offices are incompatible, by the acceptance of the latter the first is relinquished and vacant, even if it should be a superior office.
Page 23 - Your fate, your fortunes, your connections, and every thing you hold dear, depend on its imperious power. Let us have the courage to speak the truth at all times and in all places. Here, the criminal proceedings, so far from approaching...

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