An Atlas of Classical Geography

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George Long
Sheldon, 1870 - Geography, Ancient - 88 pages
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Page 30 - Sinai to the entire country, 23,000 square miles in area, bounded on the north by the Mediterranean; on the south by the Red Sea; on the west by the Canal and the Gulf of Suez; and on the east by the Gulf of Aqaba and the...
Page 30 - ... Numidia, the country of Jugurtha, and the scene of the first exploits of Marius, which prepared the way for Metellus Numidicus to finish the war and carry Jugurtha prisoner to Rome. The last western division of this African coast was Mauretania, the kingdom of Bocchus and of Juba, bounded on the N.
Page 31 - GERMANIA, in the most extended sense of the term, reached from the Alps to the North and Baltic Seas, and from the Rhine to the Vistula.
Page 19 - Viminal, and Quirinal. — 1. On the Capitol, were the temples of Jupiter Feretrius, and ' Jupiter CapitolinuS) and the Tabularium, or Register-office. 2. The Palatine, on which Rome was originally built, (thence called Roma Quadrata, from the form of that hill,) was afterwards almost entirely covered with the Palace of Augustus and the Temple of Apollo with the library attached to it ; — of all which nothing remains but a few substructions. 3. The Aventine, the seat of the robber Cacus and long...
Page 21 - INTRODUCTORY [╗o.i4 which extends uninterruptedly from southern Carinthia and Styria and southern and south-western Hungary to the southern frontiers of Montenegro and Serbia, and is bounded on the west by the Adriatic and on the east by Bulgaria. On the fringes of this territory there are almost everywhere areas of mixed population where the drawing of an equitable frontier line will be a matter of extreme difficulty, further complicated by the frequent conflict of racial and strategic considerations....
Page 28 - The physical characteristic of this conntry is an almost continuous range of MOUNTAINS, stretching from north to south in a direction parallel to the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, and nowhere far distant from it. Though it assumes different local appellations, the chain may be called by the general name of...
Page 28 - ... little information. Not only are there no remains of the famous temple of Diana at Ephesus, but the very site of the town is disputed. The existence of former civilization is attested by fragments, curious and...
Page 28 - ┐Egean, was in ancient times the seat of many noble cities, adorned with splendid monuments of art, time and barbarism have either entirely destroyed even the ruins, or left them in such shapeless, scattered, and mutilated masses, as to convey but little information. Not only are there no remains of the famous temple of Ephesus, but the very site of the town is disputed. The existence of former civilization is attested by fragments, curious and interesting indeed, but not singly of importance enough...
Page 31 - EO¤PT is the north-east portion of the great peninsular -continent of AFRICA, situated between the Tropic of Cancer (23░ 30') and 31░ 30' N. latitude, and between 30░ and 35░ E. longitude. There is perhaps no part of the world, out of Italy and Greece, to which allusion is more frequently made by the poets and orators of antiquity than to Egypt ; but no ancient writer who is not a professed peographer goes much into detail, or mentions more than one or two of its towns and localities.

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