An Aviator's Wife

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Dodd, Mead., 1920 - Autographs - 169 pages
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Page 134 - Well, I've done all I can to make this combination fly. But the Lord never meant it to stay in the air, and far be it from me to dispute the matter any longer.
Page 31 - If a plane is left for a second to its own devices it tips and begins to shoot sideways instead of going forward. Then you get into the deadly side-slip. To keep the machine from tipping, that is, to preserve its lateral stability, you must move this same lever to the left or right, which warps the wings and keeps the machine on a horizontal keel.
Page 31 - ... mental and physical. If I should move the lever a bit to the right when it should go to the left, it would mean a sideslip or a side somersault. In either case it might easily be the end of me.
Page 124 - I am sure he had more than one regret himself when the American imitation appeared. It lacked the fine workmanship and finish of the French machine. A casual observer might not be able to tell it from the Dragonfly...
Page 137 - ... it was his first attempt at track racing. He deserves immense credit for that bit of flying, for his opponents were Tom Sopwith, best known as the inventor of the Sopwith plane, and Rene Simon, an expert aerodrome flyer from France. The race Was twenty laps, each lap being a mile. At first Ovington found it difficult to turn the sharp corners at each end of the elongated track. There was a deadly danger in banking too steeply on the turns and falling into a side slip. But he soon overcame this...
Page 85 - One skyblue note, I remember, was particularly to the point : " I am a young girl nineteen years old, single, and fair to look at, brave, and will go the limit.
Page 127 - improve' the planes which they try to imitate until they won't leave the ground, and if they do go up they are poor flyers.
Page 18 - The grease-covered mechanics wheeled out one of the patched up machines kept especially for 'taxi-drivers,' like myself, and I clambered into the cockpit. The cane-bottom seat was not more than ten inches wide and its back consisted of a strip of three-ply veneer, three inches wide and a quarter of an inch thick. To make it still lighter it was bored full of holes. The French certainly do peel down their machines to make them light ! I had been told to steer for a pylon at the...
Page 137 - ... introduce racing in the air, Ovington won the race for monoplanes, though it was his first attempt at track racing. He deserves immense credit for that bit of flying, for his opponents were Tom Sopwith, best known as the inventor of the Sopwith plane, and Rene Simon, an expert aerodrome flyer from France.
Page 50 - As soon as the words were out of my mouth I realized what I had done.

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