An elegant and learned discourse of the light of nature

Front Cover
T. Williams, 1669 - Religion - 387 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 79 - Zebulun and Naphtali were a people that jeoparded their lives unto the death In the high places of the field.
Page 29 - For a small moment have I forsaken thee, but with great mercies will I gather thee. In a little wrath I hid my face from thee for a moment ; 'but with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on thee, saith the Lord thy Redeemer.
Page 36 - Creature, nor graven like a dead letter upon livelesse, and decaying Pillars; but written with the point of a Diamond, nay, with the finger of God himself in the heart of man.
Page 12 - Grace ; nay, nothing but what shall make for the greater brightening and amplifying of the free grace and distinguishing goodness of God in Christ ; and nothing but what an Augustine, or a Bradwardine, those great patrons of grace, would willingly set their seals unto. Well then, as for nature, though it be not far from any one of us, though it be so intimate to our very beings ; though it be printed and engraved upon our essences, and not upon ours only, but upon the whole creation; and though we...
Page 78 - Platonists in this were commendable, that look'd upon the Spirit of a Man as the Candle of the Lord; though they were deceiv'd in the time when 'twas lighted.
Page 4 - Sun in his brightnesse and glory ? What though Reason cannot reach to the depths, to the bottomes of the Ocean, may it not therefore swim, and hold up the head as well as it can? What though it cannot enter into the Sanctum Sanctorum, and pierce within the...
Page 137 - God face to face. Grace doth not come to pluck up nature as a weed, to root out the essences of men ; but it comes to graft spirituals upon morals, that so by their mutual supplies and intercourse they may produce most noble and generous fruit.
Page 19 - tis tied to the chair of Jupiter, and a command is onely vigorous, as it issues out, either immediately, or remotely, from the great Sovereign of the world. So that TO ov, is the sure bottome and foundation of every Law.
Page 4 - ... so swiftly, so strongly, as once it could: will they not therefore allow it to move, to stir, to flutter up and down, as well as it can ? The Turrets, and Pinnacles of the stately structure are fallen : will they therefore demolish the whole Fabrick, and shake the very Foundations of it, and down with it to the ground ? Though it be not a Jacob's Ladder to climbe up to Heaven by, yet may they not use it as a staff to walk upon Earth...
Page 95 - Essence; who, by his infinite virtue, was to produce them all; who, being an intelligent Centre, did see those several Lines that might be drawn from him; and withall, being a free and a voluntary Centre, did know how many Lines he meant to draw for himself.

Bibliographic information