An Encyclopædia of Domestic Economy ...

Front Cover
Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1852 - Home economics - 1264 pages
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Contents

Fumigation or disinfecting Buildings or Apart
117
Chap II
125
Bituminous Substances used for Light
133
Cocoanut Candle
137
Other Varieties of Candles
139
Relative Quantities of Light from various Candles and Lamps
141
Candlesticks
143
Chap IV
147
Argand s Lamp
151
Annular French Lamp
152
Parkers Sinumbra Lamp V Quarrells Sinumbra Lamp VI Isis Lamp
153
Quarrells Albion Lamp
154
Parkers Hot Oil Lamp IX The Solar Lamp
156
Keirs Fountain Lamp
158
Parkers Fountain Lamp
158
Carcel Lamp
158
Lamps for Reading
160
Lamps to burn solid Oils X V Wax Lamps
161
Lamp without Flame XVII Carriage Lamps
162
Hall Lamps XIX Candelabra
163
Very intense Lights XXI Management of Lamps
164
Illumination by Means of Gas
168
BOOK V
177
I Woods
182
Ivory
183
Marble
186
Scagliola
187
Papier machec
191
Horn
192
Whalebone
193
Caoutchouc or India Rubber
196
1 General Observations
197
Platinum
198
Iron
199
Copper
201
Iad
202
Tin
203
Zinc
204
Substances for Scouring and Polishing
207
Chap IV
210
Bronzing Chap V
211
Chap VII
213
Chap VIII
215
Chap IX
219
I Window Curtains
220
Window Blinds III Carpets and Rugs
225
Floor Cloth and Oil Cloth Covers V Tables and Stands
229
Sideboards
238
Sofas
241
Chairs and Seats Page 213
243
Bookcases Bookstands and Writing Desks
251
Screens
255
Sculpture PaintingsAc
256
Tapestry Embroidery and Filigree 25
259
Chap XI
261
Chap XII
262
Bedroom Chairs
273
Towel and Wash Stands
275
Wardrobes
278
Chests Drawers c
279
Invalid Furniture
281
Chap XIV
286
Chap XV
289
Principles of Pottery
290
Common Red Pottery and Stoneware
291
English White Stoneware and Wedgwoods Wares
292
Other Kinds of Earthenware made in Eng land
295
Porcelain
296
Porcelain of various Countries
299
Purchasing and mending China
301
Chap XVI
302
Composition of Glass 303
303
Process of Glassblowing 304
304
Various Kinds of Gtass In common Use 31 5
308
Coloured Glass and Enamel 309
309
Glass Beads
310
Glass used as Table Furniture
311
Chap XVII
312
Silversmith
314
Chap XVIII
318
Observations on sharpening cutting Instru ments in general
321
Remarks oh polishing Metals
322
Condition of Domestic Servants
323
Water
334
Chap II
342
Manner In which Nutrition Is performed
354
Chap III
371
Goat
377
Chap V
392
Quail
398
White Grouse 404
404
Elicampane
479
Edible Plants growing wild in England
480
Cinnamon
512
Rain Water
518
Well Water 544
524
Salt
527
Chemical Tests for examining Water
535
11 614 615 616 1118
538
Forming Wells and raiting Water 541
543
Alcohol
554
1 French Wines 005
591
Various Kinds of cheap Beer made
593
Wines of Germany Hungary and Switzer land
609
Wines of Portugal
613
Spanish Wines 5 Wines of Madeira and the Azores
615
Wines of Italy Sicily and Greece
616
Wines of Africa
617
Wines of Asia and America
618
On mixing Foreign Wines In the Manufac ture and particularly with Brandy 019
619
Tabic of the Quantity of Alcohol in several Kinds of Wine and other Liquors analysed by Brandc Prout c also Prices of Wines
620
1 Construction of the Winecellar 041
641
Racking 042
642
Bottling Wines
643
Diseases of Wine and their Remedies
645
Choice of Wines
646
Coopering 051
651
Perry
657
Mead
658
Chap VI
660
Raisin Vinegar 3 Common Vinegar
662
Vinegar from various Substances
663
B Preservation and purifying of Vinegar 6 Wood Vinegar
664
Adulteration of Vinegar
666
Chap VII
667
Chap VIII
674
General Principles of the Production of ardent Spirits
675
1 Brandy
676
Rum
678
Corn or Malt Spirit
679
Spirit from various Vegetable Substances
681
Proof Spirit
682
Rectification of Spirits
683
Compound Spirituous Liquors
684
Geneva and Gin
685
Usqnebach
687
Ratafias
688
Cordials
689
Legal Enactments respecting Spirits
690
Chap IX
691
Beverages consisting of Water impregnated with Carbonic Acid Gas together with certain Saline Ingredients
693
Beverages composed partly of fermented Liquors
694
Chap X
696
Various Kinds of Tea Imported 698
698
Chemical Analysis of Tea and its medical Effects 099
699
Adulteration of Tea 700
700
Consumption of Tea 701
701
Plants employed as Substitutes for Tea
702
Teapots and Teakettles
704
Chap XI
707
Analysts of Coffee 708
708
Preserving Coffee
710
Substitutes for Coffee
716
Chap XII
717
Chap XIII
719
and the various Kinds of Canesugar
721
Sugarcandy Barley Sugar and Syrup
724
On our Supplies of Sugar 726
726
Maple Sugar
727
Grapesugar
728
Chap XV
729
BOOK IX
731
Chap II
733
Wheat 73 1
735
Barley
737
Oats
738
Rye
739
Rice
740
Maize or Indian Corn 741
741
Millet
742
Peas and Beans
743
Chap III
749
Adulteration of Bread 755
755
On the Bakehouse Construction of Ovens
761
Preservation of Food by Cold
777
Preserving Meat and Fish by Sugar
783
Preservation of Meat by Potting
790
Preserving Fruit and Vegetables by Scald
796
by Syrup
802
Chap V
850
BOOK XII
859
Hats Cap and other Coverings for the Head
863
Arrangement of the Table and Order
867
Preparation of Meat c for Cooking
876
Gloves
879
Sauces
900
BOOK XIV
915
Gravies Sauces and Purees i
925
BOOK XV
931
BOOK XVI
938
Gruels and Caudles
944
Spinning and Weaving
955
Chap 111
961
Preparation of Cotton Wool for the Manu
974
Chap V
983
Chap VI
993
Chap VIII
997
BOOK XIX
1028
Chap IX
1038
BOOK XX
1044
Description of Essential Oils or Essences
1053
Tinctures and Extracts
1060
Gems belonging to the Species Corundum
1066
Pearls
1073
Theory of Washing
1074
Water for Washing
1080
Starching
1086
Washing by Machines 1013
1093
Description of Fourwheeled Carriages with
1110
Various Details respecting the Parts of a Car
1124
Duties of the Coachman Groom
1144
Purchase of Horses
1150
Milking and Management of Milk 1158
1158
Chap VI
1168
Common Fowls
1174
Arrangement of Nurseries 1187
1188
Nursery Attendants
1202
s favourable to the Preservation
1214
Hot Bath 122
1225
Corns
1234
Dislocations
1244
Course to be pursued by Nurses In Cases
1252

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 428 - ... walks elate, and as it were on tiptoe, feeding with great earnestness in a morning, so sure will it rain before night. It is totally a diurnal animal, and never pretends to stir after it becomes dark. The tortoise...
Page 185 - ... them on a sieve. The feathers should be afterwards well washed in clean water, and dried upon nets, the meshes of which may be about the fineness of cabbage nets. The feathers must be from time to time shaken upon the nets, and as they dry will fall through the meshes, and are to be collected for use.
Page 309 - I myself thought good to imitate the Italian fashion by this forked cutting of meat, not only while I was in Italy, but also in Germany, and oftentimes in England since I came home...
Page 186 - Since this work was printed off, I have seen a substance excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the marks of a black lead pencil.
Page 309 - Italian, and also most strangers that are commorant in Italy, do always at their meals use a little fork when they cut their meat.
Page 416 - I conclude that the fat of salmon between the flakes, is mixed with much albumen and gelatine, and is extremely liable to decompose, and by keeping it cool the decomposition is retarded, and by the boiling salt and water, which is of a higher temperature than that of common boiling water, the albumen is coagulated, and the curdiness preserved. The crimping, by preventing the irritability of the fibre from being gradually exhausted, seems to preserve it so hard and crisp, that it breaks under the...
Page 309 - The reason of this their curiosity is, because the Italian cannot by any means indure to have his dish touched with fingers, seeing all men's fingers are not alike cleane.

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