An Essay on Professional Ethics

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T. & J.W. Johnson, 1876 - Legal ethics - 214 pages
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Page 34 - It would be giving to the legislature a practical and real omnipotence, with the same breath which professes to restrict their powers within narrow limits. It is prescribing limits, and declaring that those limits may be passed at pleasure.
Page 74 - Whoso diggeth a pit shall fall therein : and he that rolleth a stone, it will return upon him.
Page 92 - From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say that he will or will not stand between the crown and the subject arraigned in the court where he daily sits to practice, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end.
Page 180 - Long in his highness' favour, and do justice For truth's sake and his conscience; that his bones, When he has run his course and sleeps in blessings, May have a tomb of orphans
Page 87 - ... [A]n advocate, in the discharge of his duty, knows but one person in all the world, and that person is his client. To save that client by all means and expedients, and at all hazards and costs to other persons, and...
Page 55 - There is, perhaps, no profession after that of the sacred ministry, in which a high-toned morality is more imperatively necessary than that of the law.
Page 33 - So if a law be in opposition to the Constitution; if both the law and the Constitution apply to a particular case, so that the court must either decide that case conformably to the law, disregarding the Constitution, or conformably to the Constitution, disregarding the law, the court must determine which of these conflicting rules governs the case. This is of the very essence of judicial duty. If, then, the courts are to regard the Constitution, and the Constitution is superior to any ordinary act...
Page 37 - ... deprived of his life, liberty, or property, unless by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
Page 56 - Court, according to the best of your learning and ability, and with all good fidelity, as well to the Court as to the client ; that you will use no falsehood, nor delay any person's cause for lucre or malice.
Page 77 - God forbid that it should be imagined that an attorney or a counsel or even a judge, is bound to know all the law...

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