An Essay on the Air-pump and Atmospheric Railway: Containing Formulae and Rules for Calculating the Various Quantities Contained in Mr. Robert Stephenson's Report on Atmospheric Propulsion, for the Directors of the Chester and Holyhead Railway Company

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J. Williams and Company, 1847 - Air-pump - 96 pages
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Page 93 - First. Passengers may be conveyed to the greatest distance through the country with .ease and great safety at the rate of a mile in a minute, or fifty miles per hour upon an average, and at the expense of one farthing per mile. Second. All kind of portable goods, merchandize, manufacture, and produce, will be conveyed with the same velocity, at the expense of one penny per ton per mile conveyance.
Page 6 - SURVEYING.— An Introduction to the present practice of Surveying and Levelling, being a plain explanation of the Subject and of the instruments employed, illustrated with suitable plans, sections, and diagrams, also with engravings of the Field Instruments, by SC Brees, CE, 8vo, cloth, 3s.
Page 93 - No locks or other obstructions will be required in the passage, for the force of the impelling air will be sufficient to gain an ascent of 100 feet in a mile continually.
Page 7 - Harbors, &c. ; giving the quantities for each base and slope at one view ; with a Practical Treatise on Earthwork in general.
Page 46 - On this system of working railways, the moving power is communicated to the trains by means of a continuous pipe or main, of suitable diameter, laid in the middle of the track, and supported by the same crosssleepers to which the chairs and rails are attached. The internal surface of the pipe being properly prepared by a coating of tallow, a travelling piston made air-tight by leather packing, is introduced therein, and is connected to the...
Page 46 - ... to which the chairs and rails are attached. The internal surface of the pipe being properly prepared by a coating of tallow, a travelling piston made air-tight by leather packing, is introduced therein, and is connected to the leading carriage of each train by an iron plate or coulter. In this position, if part of the air be withdrawn from that length of pipe in front of the piston by an air-pump, worked from a stationary engine or by other mechanical means, placed at a suitable distance...
Page 5 - Quantities of matter in all bodies are in the compound ratio of their magnitude and densities; for if the magnitudes are equal, the quantities of matter will be as the densities; and if the densities are equal, the quantities of matter will be as the magnitudes : therefore, the quantities of matter are universally in the compound ratio of both.
Page 45 - It is very generally known that several ingenious persons have, from time to time, proposed to employ the pressure of the atmosphere, as an element of locomotive power; but their speculations and suggestions were so far removed from practical efficiency, that proposals to adopt an atmospheric or pneumatic railway have hitherto been received with contempt or ridicule; indeed, so great has been the prejudice against the principle, that very few, even among those most interested...
Page 46 - ... packing, is introduced therein, and is connected to the leading carriage of each train by an iron plate or coulter. In this position, if part of the air be withdrawn from that length of pipe in front of the piston by an air-pump, worked from a stationary engine or by other mechanical means, placed at a suitable distance, a certain amount of pressure on the back of the piston (being the locomotive force) will take place, proportioned to the power employed ; in practice, and to work economically,...
Page 47 - ... at some little distance behind the piston, progressively lift up for the space of a few feet, and another set of rollers attached to the carriage close down again, a portion of a continuous flexible valve or flap, of peculiar construction, covering the aperture ; and it is the very simple, ingenious, and efficient mode of successively opening, and closing down and hermetically sealing this valve, as each train advances and moves on, that constitutes the merit of the invention, and the foundation...

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