An Essay on the Education of the People

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E. Wilson, 1825 - Education - 51 pages
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Page 4 - diversion in the tented field, And make the sorrows of mankind their sport; But war's a game, which, were their subjects wise, Kings would not play at.* Nations would do well T'extort their truncheons from the puny hands Of heroes whose infirm and baby minds Are gratified with mischief, and who spoil, Because men sutler it, their
Page 48 - He travels and expatiates; as the bee From flower to flower, so he from land to land. The manners, customs, policy, of all Pay contribution to the store he gleans. He sucks intelligence in every clime, And spreads the honey of his deep research At his return—a rich repast for me. He travels, and I too. I tread
Page 38 - where Fame's proud temple shines afar ; Ah! who can tell how many a soul sublime, Has felt the influence of malignant star, And waged, with fortune, an eternal war ; Checked by the scoff of pride, by envy's frown, And poverty's unconquerable bar, In life's low vale, remote, has pined alone, Then dropped into
Page 48 - with a kindred heart, Suffer his woes and share in his escapes ; While fancy, like the finger of a clock, Runs the great circuit and is still at home.
Page 46 - Fiction strongly shows that a greater variety of things, a more perfect order, a more beautiful variety, than can any where be found in nature, is pleasing to the mind. And as real history gives us not the success of things, according to the deserts of
Page 26 - intolerance it will be a most certain cure; but a pure and true religion has nothing to fear from the greatest expansion which the understanding can receive by the study either of matter or of mind. The more widely science is diffused, the better will the Author of all things be
Page 38 - Checked by the scoff of pride, by envy's frown, And poverty's unconquerable bar, In life's low vale, remote, has pined alone, Then dropped into a grave, unpitied and unknown!
Page 13 - a man's nature runs either to herbs or to weeds, therefore let him seasonably water the one and destroy the other;
Page 46 - and virtue, fiction corrects it, and presents us with the fates and fortunes of persons rewarded or punished according to merit. And, as real history disgusts us with a familiar and constant similitude of things, fiction relieves

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