An essay towards the probable solution of this question, Whence come the stork and the turtle, the crane and the swallow, when they know and observe the [a]ppointed time of their coming, or Where those birds do probably make their recess and abode, which are absent from our climate at some certain times and seasons of the year

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Printed for Samuel Crouch, 1703 - Birds - 50 pages
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Page 29 - ... that I can hear of; therefore, I conceive, they leave not the land to go beyond sea : Nor is it probable that they hide in the sand, or seek lurking-places to sleep in; for then, methinks, they should be more dull and drooping towards their going, to sleep: No ; rather their chearfulness seems to intimate, that...
Page 46 - ... will find it in the same line of direction, where it was when they begun their journey; for, suppose it full moon at the place where they began, just at two months end it will be full moon again to the same place which they left; therefore, if they proceed in the same straight line, they will be sure...
Page 43 - As for eating, it may possibly be without, in that temperof th« anher, where it passeth, which may not be apt to prey upon the spirits, as our lower nitrous air; and yet, even here, bears are said to live upon their summer fat all the winter long, in Greenland, without any new supply of food. Now we noted before, that some of those birds (and perhaps it may be true of the rest) are very succulent and sanguine, and so may have their provisions laid up in their very bodies for the voyage. As to sleep,...
Page 32 - one day a most excellent hawk, being at his game, in the King's presence, mounted with his game so high, that both hawk and heron got out of sight, and were never seen more. Enquiry was made, not only over all England, but in all the foreign princes courts in Europe, the hawk having the King's jesses, and marks sufficient, whereby it might be known, but all was to no purpose.
Page 6 - ... as the souls of brutes. Certainly, if this were granted, there would be one step more (not yet taken notice of) to advance the throne of the highest perfection, and no such chasm, and vast distance between things spiritual and corporeal, that there need to be vehicles invented to join them together in one compositwn.
Page 44 - ... contribute; for we see the like in a chicken, which if you swing in your hand, with its head under its wing, you will presently lay it asleep. Now it is likely, these birds, being there, where they have no objects to divert them, may shut their eyes, and so swing on fast asleep, till they come where some change of air (as a middle region about the moon or earth) may, by its cold, awake them. Add to this, that this sleep spares their provisions; for, if, as some would have it, cuckoos, or swallows,...
Page 10 - ... to breed, as salmon, trout, &c, and after go down into the greater rivers, as trouts, or as low as the mouth of the rivers, into the very sea, yet not so far but they may now and then have a gust of fresh water, as is observed in the salmon, which* being marked when they were young spawns, and cast into the rivers, have gone down into the sea, and returned again full grown with their marks into the same river. Some are sea fish, that come in great shoals at certain seasons, as mullet, mackarel,...
Page 27 - ... flight, in such a course, where is necessarily required a constant support of its weight. Hence, therefore, we conjecture, it never came from any part of the earth, that lies beyond our seas; for it would never venture at rights over any sea, or considerable breadth of water; much less, that it should come from parts remote beyond man's travels ; therefore, more probably, it is from above, where the main of the journey is performed without any gravitation. As to the windthrush (or redwing) and...
Page 4 - ... swallow, mentioned in the text, a breeder in our own country, and the stork, a breeder in our neighbour countries, of which we may obtain certain knowledge and intelligence; but the crane is an exotick, and preserved sometimes amongst us only as a rarity. 2. The second thing to be considered of them, is, their...
Page 36 - ... aerial, the heaven, in which they freely, by flying, wander about ; and, that being their excellency above other animals, that must only walk upon the earth, they are therefore called ' fowls of,' or belonging to

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