An Examination of the Trials for Sedition which Have Hitherto Occurred in Scotland, Volume 2

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David Douglas, 1888 - Scotland
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Page 46 - ... British Convention deserved transportation for fourteen years, and even public whipping ; ' and that when it was objected to by a person in company, that the people would not patiently endure the inflicting of that punishment upon the members of the British Convention, the said Lord Justice- Clerk replied, ' that the mob would be the better for the spilling of a little blood.' I pray that this may be made a minute of court." (vol. xxiii. p. 808.) Upon this being read, the Justice left the chair,...
Page 148 - There is a sort of aspiring and adventurous credulity, which disdains assenting to obvious truths, and delights in catching at the improbability of circumstances, as its best ground of faith. To what other cause, gentlemen, can you ascribe that in the wise, the reflecting, and the philosophic nation of Great Britain, a printer has been...
Page 98 - Now for my intention, let me tell you, that if I had thought there had been the least sin in the Plot, I would not have been of it for all the world; and no other cause drew me to hazard my fortune and life, but zeal to God's religion.
Page 148 - ... researches of her Hume, to the sweet and simple, but not less sublime and pathetic morality of her Burns — how, from the bosom of a country like that, genius and character and talents should be banished to a distant, barbarous soil, condemned to pine under the horrid communion of vulgar vice and base-born profligacy, for twice the period that ordinary calculation gives to the continuance of human life?
Page 148 - Scotland — a nation cast in the happy medium between the spiritless acquiescence of submissive poverty and the sturdy credulity of pampered wealth — cool and ardent — adventurous and persevering— winging her eagle flight against the blaze of every science, with an eye that never winks and a wing that never tires...
Page 7 - Do declare before God and the world, that we shall follow the wholesome example of former times, by paying no regard to any Act which shall militate against the constitution of our country.
Page 83 - ... me remind you that mercy is no small part of the duty of jurymen ; that the man who shuts his heart on the claims of the unfortunate, on him the gates of mercy will...
Page 180 - Hitherto shalt thou come, and no further,' — shall we, I say, whose forefathers defied the efforts of foreign tyranny to enslave our beloved country, meanly permit, in our day, without a murmur, a base oligarchy to feed their filthy vermin on our vitals, and rule us as they will ? No, my countrymen ! Let us lay our petitions at the foot of the throne, where sits our august prince, whose gracious nature will incline his ear to listen to the cries of his people, which he is bound to do by the laws...
Page 148 - ... wealth — cool and ardent, adventurous and persevering, winging her eagle flight against the blaze of every science, with an eye that never winks, and a wing that never tires ; crowned, as she is, with the spoils of every art, and decked with the wreath of every muse, from the deep and scrutinising researches of her Hume, to the sweet and simple, but not less sublime and pathetic morality of her Burns...
Page 118 - How could the practice of transporting arise as a regular judicial proceeding, before this, in the face of these two considerations ? — First, that anciently Scotland had no foreign possession, or at least none that was used for the detention of convicts. Second, that, as Sir George Mackenzie lays it down, " With us no judge can confine a man whom he banisheth, to any place without his jurisdiction, because he hath no jurisdiction over other countries, and so cannot make any Acts, or pronounce...

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