An Exposition of the Practice of Affusing Cold Water on the Surface of the Body: As a Remedy for the Cure of Fever; to which are Added, Remarks on the Effects of Cold Drink, and of Gestation in the Open Air in Certain Conditions of that Disease

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Martin, Bell & Bradfute, 1808 - Fever - 429 pages
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Page 275 - I conduct the patient into an apartment where the air is of a high temperature, I apply warm fomentations to the extremities, I purify the skin by friction with brushes, soap, and warm water, I affuse warm water on the surface generally, or I immerse the whole body into a warm bath. It is evident that equal distribution of heat and superficial circulation cannot fail to be promoted by the operation of the means stated.
Page 55 - ... of being so precisely measured by the help of an instrument as that assumed in the Medical Reports ; but it is a general condition, capable of improvement, almost of creation. It in fact consists, or is supposed to consist in a condition necessary to animal life, viz. susceptibility of impression. The subject, as susceptible, is more or less readily disposed to be acted upon, and, according to relative condition, more or less capable of assuming a new form of action with the application of a...
Page 152 - Douglas relates that after the care of the sick had devolved upon him, sixty-two m*^ (thirty-seven of whom were seamen) were attacked with the symptoms of yellow fever, the whole of whom recovered by bleeding. Three others were likewise bled, but he observes, so late in the disease, or not until the symptoms of fever were so fully established, as not to be within reach of the remedy.
Page 122 - ... 2. Neither ought it to be used when the heat measured by the thermometer is less than, or even only equal to, the natural heat, though the patient should feel no degree of chilliness.
Page 152 - ... evident to the troops and ship's company, that, after a short time, they would, on being taken ill, apply to be bled; and Lieutenant Douglas became so confident of its good effects, if had recourse to at the onset of the disease, as to induce him to give particular directions to be called in the night, should any one be seized with the leading symptoms of the disease; and in every case (the three alluded to excepted) he had the happiness to see every symptom give way or diminished, and unfavourable...
Page 386 - ... electricity. 2. If you are not furnished with a cup, and are obliged to drink by bringing your mouth in contact with the stream which issues from a pump, or a spring, always wash your hands and face, previously to your drinking, with a little of the cold water. By receiving...
Page 38 - For the purpose of removing the prostration and languor accompanying a form of fever prone to attack foreigners arriving in hot climates, he observes, that ' the principal trust was placed in warm and cold bathing, which under proper management seldom failed of answering every expectation completely, or of speedily removing the chief symptoms of danger.
Page 152 - ... symptoms of fever were so fully established, as not to be within reach of the remedy. " Lieutenant Douglas remarks, the success in treating the disease was so evident to the troops and ship's company, that, after a short time, they would, on being taken ill, apply to be bled; and Lieutenant Douglas became so confident of its good effects, if had recourse to at the onset of the disease, as to induce him to give particular directions to be called in the night, should any one be seized with the...
Page 54 - The presence of heat is judged by the application of a thermometer ? and when this instrument indicates its existence, the remedy is applied almost without restriction ; when it fails to indicate it, the cold affusion has no place. Hence, as increased heat is not always...
Page 56 - I conclude that, as susceptibility of impression is variously affected by the action of a febrile cause; and, as cold water is only of a given force, the first practical step of the physician must be necessarily directed to the means of bringing susceptibility to a common level, so that the remedy may act with due impression throughout.

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