An Historical Account of the Great Level of the Fens: Called Bedford Level, and Other Fens, Marshes and Low-lands in this Kingdom, and Other Places; ... by the Late W. Elstobb, Engineer

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W. Whittingham and sold by S. Crowder, London, 1793 - Bedford Level (England) - 280 pages
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Page 179 - for the honour of his kingdom, he would not any longer suffer these countries to be abandoned to the will of the waters, nor to let them lie waste and unprofitable ; and that if no one else would undertake their drainage, he himself would become their undertaker.
Page 231 - I am fully of opinion, if it is kept constantly in use, and under the same regulations for damming up the water above as at the first, that in the course of a few years, the channel instead of being improved, will be greatly injured, and the outfall prejudiced thereby. And had that expense been saved, and the tides had free admission into the said new river, there is great reason to believe that the Channel and Outfall would...
Page 32 - ... of the old gowt, they met with the roots of trees, many of them issuing from their several boles or trunks spread in. the ground, which, when they had taken up (the roots and the earth they grew in), they met with a solid...
Page 231 - ... scoured out so deep, that vessels of twelve or thirteen feet water or more might, upon any ordinary tide, come up to the quays and...
Page 78 - It hath been a long received opinion, as well by the borderers upon the Fens as others, that the total drowning of this Great Level (whereof we have in our times been...
Page 24 - Witlesey, in the casting of those moats by Mr. Underwood, for the fenceing in of his new plantation of fruit trees, viz. that digging through the moor at eight feet deep, they came to a perfect soil, and swaths of grass lying thereon as they were first mowed; which clearly manifests, that some great land flood, many ages since, meeting with an obstruction at the natural ostiaries towards the sea, by reason of much silt, which after a long drought had choaked them up, did then spread itself...
Page 126 - Heaven itself; the very marshes abounding with trees whose length without knots do emulate the stars. The plain there is as level as the sea, which with the flourishing of the grass allureth the eye, and so smooth that there is nothing to hinder him that runs through it. Neither is there any waste place in it; for in some parts...
Page 82 - Report concerning the Drainage of the North Level of the Fens, and the Outfall of the Wisbeach Hiver.
Page 119 - Gnthlac, who, finding it a place of horror and great solitude, began to inhabit there), is now changed into delightful meadows and arable lands; and whatever part does not produce corn or hay, does abundantly bring forth sedge, turf, and other fuel, very useful to the borderers; which...
Page 34 - Near the river Welland, which runs through Spalding, Anno 1696, at the depth of about ten feet, there were found jetties, (as they call them) to keep up the old river's bank, and the head of a tunnel that emptied the land water into the old river; and, at about twenty or thirty yards distance from the present river, there were dug up, about the like depth, several old boats; which things shew, that anciently the river was either much wider than now it is, or ran in...

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