An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Town and Castle of Warwick and of the Neighbouring Spa of Leamington

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H. Sharpe, 1815 - Leamington (England) - 468 pages
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Page 460 - His garment, nought but many ragged clouts, With thornes together pind and patched was, The which his naked sides he wrapt abouts : And him beside there lay upon the gras...
Page 367 - The length of his life enriched the reigns of several princes, and disgraced the last of them. A variety of knowledge proclaims the universality, a multiplicity of works the abundance, St. Paul's the greatness, of Sir Christopher's genius. The noblest temple, the largest palace, the most sumptuous hospital, in such a kingdom as Britain, are all works of the same hand. He restored London, and recorded its fall.
Page 208 - ... all unnecessary episode, and trivial ornament, either of secondary groups or architectural subdivision. In his compositions the beholder was forcibly struck by the sentiment at the first glance, the gradations and varieties of which he traced through several characters, all conceived in an elevated spirit of dignity and beauty, with a lively expression of nature in all the parts. His heads were various: the male were decided and grand ; the female lovely : his figures resembled the antique ;...
Page 265 - Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly' ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me ; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Page 467 - Witty above her sexe, but that's not all, Wise to Salvation was good Mistris Hall, Something of Shakespere was in that, but this Wholy of him with whom she's now in blisse. Then, passenger, ha'st ne're a teare, To weepe with her that wept with all? That wept, yet set herselfe to chere, Them up with comforts cordiall. Her Love shall live, her mercy spread, When thou hast ne're a teare to shed.
Page 43 - ... months ; Fulke, who died at the age of twentytwo months and six days ; and Francis, who succeeded him. He died July 28, 1727, aged 33. FRANCIS GREVILLE succeeded his father as Lord Brooke at the age of eight years, and, as soon as he came of age, was chosen Recorder of Warwick...
Page 459 - And all about old stockes and stubs of trees, Whereon nor fruit nor leafe was ever seen, Did hang upon the ragged rocky knees ; On which had many wretches hanged beene, Whose carcases were scattred on the greene, And throwne about the cliffs.
Page 220 - The atrocity of the father's nature was rebated in her by the mother's sweeter inclinations; for (to take, and that no more than the character out of his own mouth) HE NEVER SPARED MAN IN HIS ANGER, NOR WOMAN IN HIS LUST.
Page 422 - He was wont to go to his native country once a year. I think I have been told that he left 200?.
Page 467 - When all is spoken that can be saide a woman so garnished with virtue as not to be bettered and hardly to be equalled by any. As shee lived most virtuously so shee died most Godly. Set downe by him yt best did knowe what hath byn written to be true. Thomas Lucye.

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