An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Town and Castle of Warwick and of the Neighbouring Spa of Leamington

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H. Sharpe, 1815 - Leamington (England) - 468 pages
 

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Page 260 - Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For (as I am a man) I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Page 108 - BACON (SiR NICHOLAS), lord keeper of the great seal in the reign of queen Elizabeth, descended from an ancient and honourable family in Suffolk.
Page 203 - ... possible, rejecting all unnecessary episode, and trivial ornament, either of secondary groups or architectural subdivision. In his compositions the beholder was forcibly struck by the sentiment at the first glance, the gradations and varieties of which he traced through several characters, all conceived in an elevated spirit of dignity and beauty, with a lively expression of nature in all the parts. His heads were various: the male were decided and grand ; the female lovely : his figures resembled...
Page 159 - ... months ; Fulke, who died at the age of twentytwo months and six days ; and Francis, who succeeded him. He died July 28, 1727, aged 33. FRANCIS GREVILLE succeeded his father as Lord Brooke at the age of eight years, and, as soon as he came of age, was chosen Recorder of Warwick...
Page 215 - The atrocity of the father's nature was rebated in her by the mother's sweeter inclinations; for (to take, and that no more than the character out of his own mouth) HE NEVER SPARED MAN IN HIS ANGER, NOR WOMAN IN HIS LUST.
Page 228 - Thefe remains, tho fictitious, no doubt, are not improper appendages of the place ; and give the imagination a kind of tinge, which throws an agreeable, romantic colour on all the veftiges of this venerable pile.
Page 419 - He was wont to go to his native country once a year. I think I have been told that he left 200?.
Page 417 - It is most likely that he had learned Latin sufficiently to make him acquainted with construction, but that he never advanced to an easy perusal of the Roman authors.

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