An History of England: In a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to His Son ...

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T. Barrois, 1788 - Great Britain
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Page 150 - The two dukes appear at the appointed time and place, when the king forbids the combat, and banishes the duke of Hereford for ten years and the duke of Norfolk for life.
Page 99 - I, John, by the grace of God king of England and lord of Ireland, in order to expiate my sins, from my own free will, and the advice of my barons, give to the church of Rome, to pope Innocent and his successors, the kingdom of England, and all other prerogatives of my crown. I will hereafter hold them as the pope's vassal. I will be faithful to God, to the church of Rome, to the pope my master, and his successors legitimately elected.
Page 133 - Arundel ; and the body of referve was headed by the king in perfon, who, as well as the prince of Wales, had that morning received the facrament with great devotion ; and their behaviour betokened the calm intrepidity of men, refolved on conqueft or death. The army being thus arranged, the king rode from rank to rank, with a cheerful countenance ; bad his foldiers remember the honour of their country ; and, with his eloquence, animated the whole army to a degree of enthufiaftic fervour. To oppofe...
Page 225 - The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for your good cheer, but I must not allow my laws to be broken in my sight. My attorney must speak with you.
Page 274 - Taylor, two other clergymen, whose zeal had been distinguished in carrying on the reformation, were the next that suffered. Taylor was put into a pitch barrel ; and before the fire was kindled, a faggot from an unknown hand was thrown at his head, which made it stream with blood. Still, however, he continued undaunted, singing the thirty-first psalm in English ; which one of the spectators observing, struck him a blow on the side of the head, and commanded him to pray in Latin.
Page 3 - History of England, in a series of Letters from a Nobleman to his Son.
Page 150 - ... lances, delivered one to the challenger, and sent a knight with the other to the duke of Norfolk, and proclamation was made that they should prepare for the combat. Accordingly, mounting their horses and closing their beavers, they fixed their lances in rest, and the trumpets sounded the charge.
Page 129 - Place, as his Father Edward II. loft his Crown and his Life, in the moft miferable Manner, by fuffering himfelf to be govern'd by his Minifters and protecting them from the Refentments of the People ; fo his Son very early exerted his own Authority, and freed himfelf from the...
Page 13 - When all is done (he concludes), human life is at the greatest and the best but like a froward child, that must be played with, and humoured a little, to keep it quiet, till it falls asleep, and then the care is over.
Page 150 - After which, the mareschal having measured their lances, delivered one to the challenger, and sent a knight with the other to the duke of Norfolk, and proclamation was made that they should prepare for the combat.

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