An illustrated and descriptive catalogue of rare old Persian pottery

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Press of J.J. Little & Co., 1908 - Pottery, Persian - 81 pages
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Page 5 - We search out dead men's words, and works of dead men's hands; We shut our eyes, and muse How our own minds are made...
Page 8 - Unbounded waste ! the mouldering obelisk, Here, like a blasted oak, ascends the clouds. Here Parian domes their vaulted halls disclose, Horrid with thorn where lurks the' unpitying thief, Whence flits the twilight-loving bat at eve, And the deaf adder wreaths her spotted train, The dwellings once of elegance and art ! Here temples rise, amid whose hallowed bounds Spires the black pine; while through the naked street, Once haunt of tradeful merchants, springs the grass. Here columns, heap'd on prostrate...
Page 8 - Spires the black pine, while through the naked street, Once haunt of tradeful merchants, springs the grass : Here columns heap'd on prostrate columns, torn From their firm base, increase the mouldering mass. Far as the sight can pierce, appear the spoils Of sunk magnificence ! a blended scene Of moles, fanes, arches, domes, and palaces, Where, with his brother Horror, Ruin sits.
Page 11 - ... scholars, as it is improbable that Chinese characters could be so well imitated by strangers as to deceive an expert. Should the marks prove to be really Chinese and not forgeries, an explanation of their existence on articles made in Persia is not difficult to find. An intelligent and powerful Persian sovereign like Shah Abbas, seeing the lucrative trade in porcelain which was carried on with China, may well have conceived the idea of manufacturing it in his own country, and with that object...
Page 28 - Nahinna. A Persian manufacture of majolica. The Comte de Rochechouart says that the ancient faience of Persia is as admirable as the modern is detestable, though it retains a degree of oriental elegance.
Page 8 - His sage inspiring flood, whose winding marge The thick-wove laurel shades'; though roseate Morn Pour all her splendors on the' empurpled scene ; Yet feels the hoary hermit truer joys, As from the cliff, that o'er his cavern hangs, He views the piles of fall'n Persepolis In deep arrangement hide the darksome plain. Unbounded waste ! the mouldering obelisk Here, like a blasted oak, ascends the clonds ; Here Parian domes their vaulted halls disclose Horrid with thorn, where lurks the...
Page 17 - ... house attempted to stem the tide of invasion, and by 1276 the whole of China acknowledged the sway of Kublai. At this time the Mongol sovereign ruled over an empire which was one of the largest of which the world's history has knowledge, and which claimed as its subjects the countless hordes occupying the vast territories which stretch from the Black Sea to the shores of the China Ocean, and from Northern Mongolia to the frontiers of Annam. One of the most striking features of Kublai's campaigns...
Page 24 - ... terra-cotta disappeared among the Arab and Moorish races, who had retained a traditional knowledge of the process. The application of a transparent vitreous coating or glaze over the entire surface, like the varnish of a picture, is also referable to a high antiquity, and was universally adopted, either to enhance the beauty of single colours or to promote the combination of many. Innumerable fragments and remains of glazed vases, fabricated by the Greeks and Romans, not only prove the early...
Page 9 - It is far from improbable that even the Alhambra itself was chiefly the work of Persians, who stood to the Arabs in much the same relation that the Greeks did to the Romans. The presence of a considerable colony of Persians in Spain in the time of the Moors is attested by a document assigning the town Rioja to the Persians as their place of residence. This fact was recently brought to notice by a Spanish traveller in Persia, Senor Rivadeneyra. Unlike the Arabs the Persians have always been, and still...
Page 30 - ... have established itself in Persia. On specimens from Arabia it is also found, and its use in combination with this glaze may possibly have preceded the manufacture of lustred wares coated with the stanniferous enamel, by the eastern potters of the Balearic islands, Spain, and Sicily. In northern India, at Sind, and in Persia, wares are made at the present day of precisely the same character as the ancient pottery under consideration. Pieces from the former locality, which were exhibited at the...

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