An Illustration of the Genus Cinchona: Comprising Descriptions of All the Officinal Peruvian Barks, Including Several New Species. Baron de Humboldt's Account of the Cinchona Forests of South America, and Laubert's Memoir on the Different Speies of Quinquina. To which are Added Several Dissertations of Don Hippolito Ruiz on Various Medicinal Plants of South America ... And a Short Account of the Spikenard of the Ancients ...

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J. Searle ... and Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1821 - Cinchona - 181 pages
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Page ii - An Illustration of the Genus Cinchona; comprising Descriptions of all the officinal Peruvian Barks, including several New Species ; Baron De Humboldt's Account of the Cinchona Forests of South America ; and Lambert's Memoir on the different Species of Quinquina.
Page 178 - Valerian ; and the native women, no doubt, consider the smell very agreeable, because most of such as can afford it, use oil impregnated with this root for perfuming their hair. All I can say is, that, if this root was the Spikenard of the Roman ladies, their lovers must have had a very different taste from the youth of modern Europe.
Page 95 - Quinquina is procured by incision at the beginning of spring, when the showers are gentle, frequent, and short. It is collected in bottles, where it keeps liquid for some years, in which state it is called white liquid balsam ; but when the Indians deposit this liquid in mats or calabashes, which is...
Page 22 - Loxa, of whatever cast, would die rather than have recourse to Cinchona bark, which, together with opiates, they place in the class of poisons exciting mortification. The Indians cure themselves by lemonades, by the oleaginous aromatic peel of the small green wild lemon, by infusions...
Page 23 - Cinchona; an old tradition, however, is current there, that the Jesuits at the felling of the wood had distinguished, according to the custom of the country, the different kinds of trees by chewing their barks, and that on such occasions they had taken notice of the considerable bitterness of the Cinchona. There being always medical practitioners among the missionaries, it is said they had tried an infusion of the Cinchona in the tertian ague, a complaint which is very common in that part of the...
Page 23 - In Loxa there is no document to be found that can elucidate the history of the discovery of the Cinchona : an old tradition, however, is current there, that the Jesuits, at the felling of the wood, had distinguished, according to the custom of the country, the different kinds of trees by chewing their barks ; and that, on such occasions, they had taken notice of the considerable bitterness of the Cinchona. The medical practitioners among the missionaries, it is said, tried an infusion of the Cinchona...
Page 36 - determines single specimens of dried collections, and has had no opportunity to examine or observe them in their native forests, will, as is the case with the Bronzonetta papyrifera, be led to discover different species by leaves which are of one and the same branch.
Page 21 - Camba, (near the town of Quito,) that even the vultures, ( Vultur aura.) in their neighborhood, were subject to that disorder. The story, so often copied, respecting the Countess Chinchon, Vice-Queen of Peru, is probably still more doubtful than it is generally supposed to be. There certainly was a Count Chinchon, Don Geronimo Fernandez de Cabrera Bobadella y Mendoza, who was Viceroy of Lima, from 1629 to 1639. It is very probable that his wife, after her return to Spain, in 1640, was the first who...
Page 33 - Mutis had caused to be picked at the expense of the king, was burned, as a decidedly inefficacious remedy, at a time when all the Spanish field hospitals were in the greatest want of this indispensable product of South America.
Page 95 - ... keeps liquid for some years, in which state it is called white liquid balsam ; but when the Indians deposit this liquid in mats or calabashes, which is usually done in Carthagena, and in the mountains .of Tolu, after some time it condenses, hardens into resin, and is then denominated dry white balsam of Tolu, by which name it is known in the druggists

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