An Inquiry Into the Causes of the Rise and Fall of the Lakes: Embracing an Account of the Floods and Ebbs of Lake Ontario as Determined by a Long Series of Actual Observations, and an Examination of the Various Opinions in Regard to the Late Unprecedented Flood Throughout the Chain of Great Lakes. To which is Annexed a Letter to Dr. H.H. Sherwood on His Theory of Magnetism

Front Cover
Printed at the Courier Office, 1838 - Floods - 31 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Popular passages

Page 22 - Dr. Patterson called the attention of the Society to some further extracts from the Report of the Naval Committee, in which it is stated that from the opinions obtained from scientific men, " as well as from their own examination, they are fully persuaded that the discoveries and invention of Dr. Sherwood are entitled to the most serious consideration of the public, and to the encouragement and patronage of Congress...
Page 3 - I have rendered to my prince the service that he himself most preferred. I shall have made one man happy; and Heaven for that will hold me in better account than if I had made one man powerful; for that is far more difficult. And now, monseigneur, your answer to this proposition?
Page 22 - Manual; and that five thousand additional copies be printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary.
Page 22 - regard them as highly interesting and important to the navigation and commerce of the United States, and as bidding fair to open a new era in the history of the science of magnetism." Of this Report 5000 additional copies were ordered to be printed by Congress. Dr. Patterson remarked that the imposing circumstances under which Dr. Sherwood's extraordinary claims were brought forward, might make a brief review of them worthy of the Society's attention. 1. The first of Dr. Sherwood's...
Page 26 - ... probably greater than at any other spot. We have every reason to expect that great light will be thrown on this department of the science from the labours of Professor Hansteen of Christiana, who is now travelling at the expense of the King of Sweden, and with the permission of the Emperor of Russia, for the purpose of observing the magnetic dip, variation, and intensity, over the whole of the North of Europe and of Asia. He has especially directed his attention to trace the course of the lines...
Page 21 - ... are set forth Dr. Sherwood's " claims to have made new and important discoveries in magnetism generally, and more particularly in the magnetism of the earth; and to be the inventor of an instrument called the geometer, whereby, without the aid of the quadrant or sextant, or chronometer, and without taking a celestial observation, it is practicable and easy, at sea and on land, and in all weathers, to determine, merely by the dip of the needle, the variation of the needle, and the latitude and...
Page 5 - Abstracts made at New York State Library by courtesy of the secretary and director, Mr. Melvil Dewey. From 1815 to 1821 my observations were not made with a regularity, frequency, or precision to insure exactness as to the yearly rise and fall of the lake waters; and as set down in the annexed table they may, therefore, occasionally vary in a small degree from correctness; but from the attention I gave the subject, and...
Page 17 - The canses of the lake fluctuations are too manifest to raise a shadow of doubt. They are the ascent and descent of water evaporation, rain, and snow ; but the proportion of influence exerted by each of these is the true question at issue, and must remain undecided, or at least involved in more or less doubt, until meteorology is better understood than it is at present. Mr. Giddings's record is compiled among the appended records...
Page 6 - ... that of 1838 far exceeded either of them ; being 22 inches above that of 1815, and 25 above that of 1817. I also learn that the floods reached...
Page 26 - ... Humboldt, and by De Rössel: who have completely established the general fact, that the intensity of the force of terrestrial magnetism increases as we recede from the equator, where it is weakest, till we approach the poles : at the magnetic poles themselves, it is probably greater than at any other spot. We have every reason to expect that great light will be thrown on this department of the science from the labours of Professor Hansteen of Christiana, who is now travelling at the expense of...

Bibliographic information