An Inquiry Into the Origin of the Office and Title of the Justice of the Peace ...

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Shaw and Sons, 1841 - Justices of the peace - 208 pages
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Page 34 - Crown, shall be void and of no avail or force whatever ; but the matters which are to be established for the estate of our lord the King and of his heirs, and for the estate of the realm and of the people, shall be treated, accorded, and established in Parliaments, by our lord the King, and by the assent of the prelates, earls, and barons, and the commonalty of the realm ; according as it hath been heretofore accustomed.
Page 4 - For the better keeping and maintenance of the peace, the King wills, that in every county good men and lawful, which be no maintainers of eyil, nor barrators in the county, shall be assigned to keep the peace.
Page 17 - ... to take of all them that be [not] of good fame where they shall be found, sufficient surety and mainprise of their good behavior towards the king and his people, and the other duly to punish ; to the intent that the people be not by such rioters or rebels troubled nor endamaged, nor the peace blemished, nor merchants nor other passing by the highways of the realm disturbed, nor [put in the peril which may happen] of such offenders...
Page 18 - Offenders ; and also to hear and determine at the King's Suit all manner of Felonies and Trespasses done in the same County, according to the Laws and Customs aforesaid...
Page 35 - ... forasmuch as it is given the King to understand in this present parliament, by the petition of the commonalty, that the said servants having no regard to the said ordinance, but to their ease and singular covetise, do withdraw themselves to serve great men and other, unless they have livery and wages to the double or treble of that they were wont to take...
Page i - BUT the mortallest enemy unto knowledge, and that which hath done the greatest execution upon truth, hath been a peremptory adhesion unto authority ; and more especially, the establishing of our belief upon the dictates of antiquity.
Page 90 - The general duty of all constables, both high and petty, as well as of the other officers, is to keep the king's peace in their several districts; and to that purpose they are armed with very large powers, of arresting and imprisoning, of breaking open houses, and the like...
Page 31 - Because a great part of the people, and especially of workmen and servants, late died of the pestilence, many seeing the necessity of masters, and great scarcity of servants, will not serve unless they may receive excessive wages, and some rather willing to beg in idleness, than by labour to get their living...
Page 34 - ... that such manner of servants, as well men as women, should be bound to serve, receiving salary and wages accustomed in places where they ought to serve, in the twentieth year of the reign of the king that now is, or five or six years before.
Page 17 - ... and also to inform them, and to inquire of all those that have been pillors and robbers in the parts beyond the sea, and be now come again, and go wandering, and will not labour as they were wont in times past...

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