An Introduction to Object-oriented Design in C++

Front Cover
Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1996 - C (Computer program language) - 866 pages
An Introduction to Object-Oriented Design in C++ introduces object-oriented program development from the ground-up. This book helps students develop strong object-oriented design skills from the beginning. rather than forcing students to learn procedural design and then unlearn it when they are later taught object-oriented programming.

The book covers the full range of object-oriented programming topics, from fundamental features common to all general purpose high-level languages, through classes, to inheritance and polymorphism. Students are encouraged to think and design in terms of objects and to structure their code to reflect their designs. The authors introduce students to common difficulties that arise in design and implementations, and then motivate new language features as aids for overcoming those difficulties.

The manuscript for the book has been class-tested over four semesters. Features: Begins with object-oriented analysis and design from the very first page Introduces predefined objects in Chapter 2; class libraries in Chapter 3; and students create new types of objects by creating their own classes in Chapter 7 Focuses on the object-oriented approach while introducing functions in the early chapters Helps students build on concepts such as design and reusablity by using running examples throughout the book Gives a complete picture of object-oriented programming by covering the essential elements of inheritance and polymorphism
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Contents

ObjectOriented Program Development
2
Anatomy of a Simple Program
33
Implementing Object Behaviors with Functions
87
Copyright

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Jo Perry is a Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at North Carolina State University, where she received her Ph.D in Mathematics. She and Harold Levin were instrumental in the introduction of C++ as the major teaching language of the department. She has been involved as a judge for the ACM Programming Contest Finals since 1988.

Harold Levin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at North Carolina State University. He received his BS in Mathematics from MIT and his Ph.D in Philosophy from MIT. During his years at MIT, he was a systems programmer at Project MAC. He has taught with the Computer Science Department at all levels, including seminars in C++ and object-oriented programming.



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