An Introduction to the History of the Science of Politics

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, limited, 1900 - Political science - 130 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 125 - It is a partnership in all science, a partnership in all art, a partnership in every virtue, and in all perfection. As the ends of such a partnership cannot be obtained in many generations, it becomes a partnership not only between those who are living but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born.
Page 69 - ... the act of the majority passes for the act of the whole, and of course determines as having, by the law of Nature and reason, the power of the whole.
Page 73 - But it will be said this hypothesis lays a ferment for frequent rebellion. To which I answer: First : no more than any other hypothesis. For when the people are made miserable, and find themselves exposed to the ill usage of arbitrary power, cry up their governors as much as you will for sons of Jupiter, let them be sacred and divine, descended or authorized from Heaven; give them out for whom or what you please, the same will happen.
Page 57 - ... it is no wonder if there be somewhat else required besides covenant to make their agreement constant and lasting; which is a common power, to keep them in awe, and to direct their actions to the common benefit.
Page 87 - Men cannot enjoy the rights of an uncivil and of a civil state together. That he may obtain justice, he gives up his right of determining, what it is in points the most essential to him. That he may secure some liberty, he makes a surrender in trust of the whole of it.
Page 72 - Whereas the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons assembled at Westminster, lawfully, fully and freely representing all the estates of the people of this realm...
Page 67 - The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one; and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions...
Page 90 - We have not been drawn and trussed, in order that we may be filled, like stuffed birds in a museum, with chaff and ra'gs and paltry blurred shreds of paper about the rights of man.
Page 87 - They have no right to make a law prejudicial to the whole community, even though the delinquents in making such an act should be themselves the chief sufferers by it ; because it would be made against the principle of a superior law, which it is not in the power of any community, or of the whole race of man, to alter...
Page 74 - In some commonwealths where the legislative is not always in being, and the executive is vested in a single person, who has also a share in the legislative...

Bibliographic information