An introduction to the making of Latin, conprising, after an easy, compendious method, the substance of the Latin syntax: With proper English examples, most of them translations from the classic authors, in one column, and the Latin words in another. To which is subjoin'd in the same method a succinct account of the affairs of ancient Greece and Rome ...

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Printed for C. Hitch, 1748
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Page 287 - This they can never do, give them what inftrudtions you will for it, 'till they come to have a pretty general Knowledge of Words ; fo as that upon reading a Sentence once or twice flowly and attentively over, they either difcover the Senfe or come pretty near it. That alone, and not any...
Page 287 - Tranflations direct them immediately to the Order in which Words are to be taken, and at the fame Time .immediately fupply them with the Meaning of fuch Words as they want to know the Meaning of. All that has been faid upon this Head appears to me fo very evident and inconteftable, that for my Part I fee not how it can be difputed by any one.
Page 293 - Jnftance of its being attained there, in any School that has come within the Reach of my Obfervation, or indeed any thing like it. Nay, I have talked with very ingenious Men, and...
Page 292 - Mailer or School-fellows for them' ; and fo go fmoothly forward:, without any Rubs in their Way, or Lofs of Time, and with a great deal of Satisfaction to find their Bufmefs fo very eafy.
Page 293 - I will not affirm this, yet I muft be allowed to fay, it is a Matter of very great Difficulty, infomuch that I greatly queftion whether any Method that can be taken with them, will be found generally fuccefsful, in any reafonable Time, befide* this I here recommend.
Page 88 - Arrybas' step-son, and brother of Olympias, was come to the age of twenty years, Philip, king of Macedonia, took the kingdom of Epire from Arrybas, and gave it to the youth ; being wicked towards both ; for he did not observe the laws of affinity towards him from whom he took ceor...
Page 284 - Authors for the Ufe of Schools ; the one Literal or Verbal, in which the Latin is rendered into Englilh Word for Word, or the Senfe and Meaning of every Word in the Original is given in the Tranflation : The other Free and Proper, wherein Regard is only had to the Senfe, which the Tranflator endeavours to exprefs in the moft juft and handfome Manner, without pretending to give the precife Meaning of every individual Word, as in the Literal or Verbal Way. Now both thefe Sorts of Tranflations are fo...
Page 302 - THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND: Being a Compendium adapted to the Capacities and Memories of Youth at School. And likewife ufeful for all Others who have weak Memories, and would willingly retain what they read of Englijh Hiftory.
Page 286 - Tranjlatiens; fo obvioafly fuch. that many: could not but be fenfible of it, who yet being deterred by the Difficulty of the Undertaking, and the fear of Cenfure, would not engage in the Tafk of fupplying our Schools with any Thing in that way. Now if this be the Cafe, if it be no fuch eafy Matter to tranflate the...
Page 294 - Mafters cf the Latin Tongue, could help him to, in the Way of Converfation. For the great Advantage of conftant Converfation for the Attainment of any Language, lies in the perpetual Exercife of the Invention, in what a Man fays himfelf, and the...

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