An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge

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Polity, Dec 4, 2006 - Philosophy - 212 pages
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An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates.

The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Parts III and IV provide an in-depth discussion of justification and scepticism. The final part of the book examines our alleged knowledge of the past, other minds, morality and God.

O'Brien uses engaging examples throughout the book, taking many from literature and the cinema. He explains complex issues, such as those concerning the private language argument, non-conceptual content, and the new riddle of induction, in a clear and accessible way. This textbook is an invaluable guide to contemporary epistemology.

 

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A clear and concise introduction to contemporary debates in epistemology, this title covers topics such as testimony, the internalism/externalism debate, and naturalized epistemology.

Contents

The Theory of Knowledge
3
What is Knowledge?
10
A Priori Knowledge
25
Perception
36
Testimony
50
Foundationalism
61
Coherentism
77
Internalism and Externalism
87
Naturalized Epistemology
127
Memory
141
Other Minds
152
Moral Knowledge
163
God
177
Glossary
190
References
194
Index
204

Scepticism
101
The Problem of Induction
116

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About the author (2006)

Dan O′Brien, lectures on Philosophy at the University of Birmingham and is an Associate Lecturer for the Open University.

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