An Oration Delivered Wednesday, July 4, 1827, in Commemoration of American Independence: Before the Supreme Executive of the Commonwealth, and the City Council and Inhabitants of the City of Boston ...

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From the Press of Nathan Hale--City printer, 1827 - Fourth of July celebrations - 31 pages
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Page 20 - ... to expose, whilst we may yet avoid them, some of the rocks, and precipices which lay in our path, and which are not the less dangerous because they are decked with flowers.
Page 20 - The all glorious works of nature, require the constantly sustaining and corrective hand of their great creator. And in man, and in all the labour of his hands and all the emanations of his mind, are contained the seeds of decay and dissolution. We may not hope to obtain for ourselves or our country, an exemption from this universal law, but we may hope to effect what is within the power of man to do, what it was meant he should do. We...
Page 20 - Let us avert so disastrous a termination of our hitherto brilliant career. Let us turn from the contemplation of the deeds and virtues of our ancestors ; from felicitations on our own happy circumstances; and from musings on the many bright and glowing objects which spread themselves out in the splendid prospect before us, and...
Page 21 - ... constantly sustaining and corrective hand of their great creator. And in man, and in all the labour of his hands and all the emanations of his mind, are contained the seeds of decay and dissolution. We may not hope to obtain for ourselves or our country, an exemption from this universal law, but we may hope to effect what is within the power of man to do, what it was meant he should do. We may hope, by constant watchfulness and exertions, to repress the growth of every noxious principle in our...
Page 20 - ... immortal as your ancestors'. On the same page of history on which their names and deeds are recorded, and in as imperishable characters, shall yours, also, be inscribed. And when the future heroes of far-distant centuries shall turn back to that page for stimulants to their exertions, future statesmen and patriots look there for lessons of wisdom and virtue, and the future poet draw thence a noble theme for his aspiring muse, your...
Page 10 - ... and dependent colonies of that nation, we have at once become an independent and powerful people, competing with our parent country in every thing which tends to advance and strengthen us as a nation, and to improve and ennoble us as human beings. This is the patrimony which our Fathers have left us. But great as it is, is it all that we receive from them ? Oh no, far other wise.
Page 19 - There are periods of the world, and portions of the earth, in which whole generations of men may go down silently and unnoticed to their graves, and at least enjoy the privilege of being forgotten ; when, if they may not dare to expect the praises of posterity, they may yet hope to escape its reproaches. But such is not the period in which we live, nor such the country we inhabit. I will not...
Page 11 - ... united and powerful states again dwindle into twelve disconnected and dependent colonies, and yet inheriting the manners, principles and feelings of our ancestors, estimating them as we ought, and practising upon them, and a few years would again restore us to our present state of wealth, power and happiness.
Page 17 - ... but to every other country of this globe, and all its present and all its future inhabitants.
Page 11 - ... their manners, principles and feelings. This is the priceless gift, which calls for our gratitude and praise. Let every other vestige of these men be destroyed and forgotten. Let our fruitful fields again become pathless wilds. The savage return to his ancient haunts. Let all the institutions of...

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