Analogs for Planetary Exploration

Front Cover
W. Brent Garry, Jacob E. Bleacher
Geological Society of America, 2011 - Science - 567 pages
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Where on Earth is it like Mars? How were the Apollo astronauts trained to be geologists on the Moon? Are volcanoes on Earth just like the ones on other planets? The exploration of our solar system begins in our own backyard. Discoveries on other planetary bodies cannot always be easily explained. Therefore, geologic sites on this planet are used to better understand the extraterrestrial worlds we explore with humans, robots, and satellites. Analogs for Planetary Exploration is a compilation of historical accounts of astronaut geology training, overviews of planetary geology research on Mars, educational field trips to analog sites, plus concepts for future human missions to the Moon. This Special Paper provides a great overview of the science, training, and planning related to planetary exploration for students, educators, researchers, and geology enthusiasts. After all, as we learn about the solar system we can better understand our own planet Earth.
 

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Contents

Part I Mission Training
1
2 A new paradigm for advanced planetary fi eld geology developed through
17
3 Geologic fi eld training of the Apollo astronauts and implications for future manned exploration
33
4 Training Apollo astronauts in lunar orbital observations and photography
49
5 Training astronauts to observe Earth from the space shuttle and International Space Station
67
Results from the Antarctic Search for Meteorites ANSMET austral summer season 20022003 with implications for planetary surface operations
75
7 A historical overview of the Pavilion Lake Research ProjectAnalog science and exploration in an underwater environment
85
Method assessment and lessons learned
117
19 The marinetarget Wetumpka impact structure examined in the fi eld and by shallow corehole drilling
287
The 1996 Skeišarįrsandur jökulhlaup example
301
Geological and biological perspectives
317
22 Utahs geologic and geomorphic analogs to MarsAn overview for planetary exploration
349
Part III Field Guides
377
24 Warford Ranch volcano Arizona fi eld exercise
393
Part 1 Description and history
401
Part 2 Understanding lava fl ow morphology and fl ow fi eld emplacement
435

9 Habitat dust contamination at a Mars analog
137
10 The NASA Spaceward Bound fi eld training curriculum
157
Part II Geologic Analogs
165
Terrestrial analogs for coldclimate landforms on Mars
177
A possible wet periglacial analog of Utopia Planitia Mars
203
14 The Todilto Formation as an analog of shortlived Martian fl ood evaporites
219
15 Travertine and tufa from Dalhousie Springs AustraliaImplications for recognizing Martian springs
231
Examples from the Isachsen Formation Axel Heiberg Island Canadian High Arctic
249
A terrestrial analog for the Martian nakhlite meteorites
263
An assessment of geological and potential biological systems on early Mars
279
An analog for planetary volcanism
449
28 Terrestrial analogs in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States for volcanic sedimentary and tectonic processes on other planets
465
Terrestrial analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars
483
Part IV Lunar Mission Scenarios
507
31 Plan for a human expedition to Marius Hills and its implications for viable surface exploration architecture
519
32 A sortie mission to Schrödinger Basin as reconnaissance for future exploration
533
33 Advanced regionalscale scenarios for lunar surface exploration
547
Untitled
568
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