Analysis of Darwin, Huxley and Lyell, Being a Critical Examination of the Views of These Authors in Regard to the Origin and Antiquitity of Man

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Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1866 - Human beings - 94 pages
 

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Page 10 - I believe that animals have descended from at most only four or five progenitors, and plants from an equal or lesser number.
Page 30 - It is satisfactory, as showing how transient such impressions are, to remember that the greatest discovery ever made by man, namely, the law of the attraction of gravity, was also attacked by Leibnitz, "as subversive of natural, and inferentially of revealed, religion.
Page 30 - Whence but from Heaven could men unskill'd in arts, In several ages born, in several parts, Weave such agreeing truths ? or how, or why, Should all conspire to cheat us with a lie ? Unask'd their pains, ungrateful their advice, Starving their gain, and martyrdom their price.
Page 21 - Therefore I should infer from analogy that probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed.
Page 14 - ... with a nerve sensitive to light beneath, and then suppose every part of this layer to be continually changing slowly in density, so as to separate into layers of different densities and thicknesses, placed at different distances from each other, and with the surfaces of each layer slowly changing in form. Further, we must suppose that there is a power, represented by natural selection...
Page 12 - It may be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinizing, throughout the world, every variation, even the slightest; rejecting that which is bad, preserving, and adding up all that is good; silently and insensibly working, whenever and wherever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life.
Page 36 - Whence our race has come; what are the limits of our power over nature, and of nature's power over us; to what goal we are tending; are the problems which present themselves anew and with undiminished interest to every man born into the world.
Page 62 - At the same time, no one is more strongly convinced than I am of the vastness of the gulf between civilized man and the brutes ; or is more certain that, whether from them or not, he is assuredly not of them.
Page 11 - Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows.
Page 42 - ... remain then but one order for comparison, that of the Apes (using that word in its broadest sense), and the question for discussion would narrow itself to this — is Man so different from any of these Apes that he must form an order by himself? Or does he differ less from them than they differ from one another, and hence must take his place in the same order with them?

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