Analysis of Observational Health Care Data Using SAS

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SAS Institute, Jan 25, 2010 - Mathematics - 452 pages
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This book guides researchers in performing and presenting high-quality analyses of all kinds of non-randomized studies, including analyses of observational studies, claims database analyses, assessment of registry data, survey data, pharmaco-economic data, and many more applications. The text is sufficiently detailed to provide not only general guidance, but to help the researcher through all of the standard issues that arise in such analyses. Just enough theory is included to allow the reader to understand the pros and cons of alternative approaches and when to use each method. The numerous contributors to this book illustrate, via real-world numerical examples and SAS code, appropriate implementations of alternative methods. The end result is that researchers will learn how to present high-quality and transparent analyses that will lead to fair and objective decisions from observational data.This book is part of the SAS Press program.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2010)

Douglas E. Faries is Senior Research Advisor at Lilly USA, where he oversees statistical design and analysis support for Health Outcomes Research, including retrospective claims data analyses and prospective observational studies. A SAS user for more than twenty years, he received his Ph.D. in Statistics from Oklahoma State University and his M.S. in Mathematics from Western Illinois University. Dr. Faries is a member of the American Statistical Association and the International Society of Pharmacoeconomic and Outcomes Research.

A SAS user since 1986, Robert Obenchain is Principal Consultant at Risk Benefit Statistics LLC in Carmel, Indiana; Research Fellow at the National Institute of Statistical Sciences in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina; and Adjunct Professor in Biostatistics at Indiana University Medical School in Indianapolis. Previously, Dr. Obenchain worked for thirty-seven years as a professional statistician in the telecommunications (Bell Labs) and pharmaceutical industries (Eli Lilly and Glaxo) doing data analyzes, statistical computing, and methods development. He received his Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Josep Maria Haro is Director of the Saint John of God Research and Teaching Foundation in Barcelona, Spain, which promotes and manages the research of two hospitals, the pediatric Hospital Sant Joan de Déu and the San Joan de Déu-Serveis de Salut Mental, which specializes in treatment of mental health issues. He earned an M.D. from the University of Barcelona, a Master's in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. from University Autonoma in Barcelona. A SAS user since 1990, Dr. Haro is widely published and is a member of International Federation of Psychiatric Epidemiology, the European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Schizophrenia International Research Society, and the Catalan Psychiatric Society (SCP).

Andrew C. Leon was Professor of Public Health and of Biostatistics in Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. He was a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Statistical Association, the International Biometric Society, the International Society for CNS Clinical Trials and Methodology, the International Statistical Institute, and the Society for Clinical Trials. Dr. Leon received his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from City University in New York. Dr. Leon was published in many medical journals, including the American Journal of Psychiatry and the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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