Ananda

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 2006 - Buddhism - 368 pages
The sixth book in the classic eight volume graphic novel series retelling the story of Buddha, from the godfather of the genre. In book six, as Kapiluvastu burns and it's people are hunted down, an infant refugee - Ananda - is granted the gift of invincibility by Mara, an evil demon. Nurtured by the she-devil, Ananda learns to use his power to become a fearsome bandit, honing his cruelty and selfishness before he is unleashed upon the demon's enemy: Buddha. Originated in the 1970s, Buddha is Osamu Tezuka's unparalleled rendition of the life and times of Prince Siddhartha. Tezuka's storytelling genius and consummate skill at visual expression blossom fully as he contextualizes the Buddha's ideas, with an emphasis on action, emotion, humour and conflict as Prince Siddhartha runs away from home, travels across India and questions Hindu practices such as ascetic self-mutilation and caste oppression. Rather than recommend resignation and impassivity, Tezuka's Buddha predicates enlightenment upon recognizing the interconnectedness of life, having compassion for the suffering, and ordering one's life sensibly. Furthermore, his approach is slightly irreverent in that it incorporates something that Western commentators often eschew, namely, humour.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

Those who dislike the more supernatural elements of the Buddha series should perhaps consider skipping this volume entirely, as it is largely the story of Ananda, a man chosen by a devil to find and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ImperfectCJ - LibraryThing

Beautiful illustrations alongside a touching yet kid-friendly retelling of Siddhartha's life and teachings. I love that this book included the Eight-fold Path. I read this curled up on my daughter's ... Read full review

About the author (2006)

Osamu Tezuka (1928-89) is the godfather of Japanese graphic novels. A genuine intellectual, deeply familiar with Western culture from the Bible to Goethe to Hollywood, Tezuka originally intended to become a doctor and received an M.D. Though many have followed his example, it is still Tezuka who draws the deepest awe with his sweeping vision, deftly intertwined plots, persuasive characters, feel for the workings of power, and above all, an indefatigable commitment to human dignity and the sanctity of life.

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