Anatomy and Physiology for Speech, Language, and Hearing, Volume 1

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Thomson Delmar Learning, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 759 pages
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Revised and updated with a vibrant new two-color interior design, this third edition of the best-selling Anatomy and Physiology of Speech, Language, and Hearing continues to make anatomy and physiology accessible to the reader. While organized around the classical framework of speech, language, and hearing systems, anatomy and physiology components are treated separately to facilitate learning. Clinical information is integrated with everyday experiences to underscore the relevance of anatomy and physiology to communication sciences. Accompanied by the new Anatesse CD-ROM, which offers interactive learning materials, self-study tests, diagrams, animations, and more, this book provides the user with everything needed to master the content. This exciting new edition is a must-have comprehensive book on the science critical to understanding speech, language, swallowing, and hearing systems.

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Contents

Basic Elements of Anatomy
5
Organs Tissues and Systems
13
Chapter Summary
28
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

J. Anthony (Tony) Seikel is Associate Dean and Director of the School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences at Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. His research interests center on the relationship of pathology to acoustics and perception, as well as improving pedagogy through technology. He earned his BS in Speech and Hearing from Phillips University, his MA in Speech Pathology from Wichita State University, and a PhD in Speech and Hearing Science from University of Kansas.

Douglas W. King was a professor within the Basic Medical program at Washington State University until the time of his death in 2001. He was greatly loved by his students and fellow faculty, and had set up a scholarship program in anatomy for students with diabetes.

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