Anatomy of Rebellion

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SUNY Press, 1980 - Political Science - 387 pages
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Anatomy of Rebellion provides an understanding of four rebellions that will make clear the factors that are crucial in the development of other rebellions. Seeking a political pattern in the process of rebellion, Claude Welch, Jr., has investigated four large-scale rural uprisings that came close to becoming revolutions: the Taiping rebellion in China 1850-64, the Telengana uprising in India of 1946-51, the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya of 1952-56, the Kwilu uprising in Zaire of 1963-65.

Weaving the facts of these rebellions with theories about political violence, Welch follows the rebellions through the initial stages of discontent to the explosion of violence to the suppression of the uprisings. He then challenges explanations of political violence, both Marxist and non-Marxist, that other scholars have proposed.

Rebellions have not been studied as thoroughly as the major successful revolutions, although the frequency of rebellions in the modern world is not likely to diminish. Rural dwellers' discontents are still clashing with central governments' ambitions; Anatomy of Rebellion clarifies how this volatile type of political violence occurs.
 

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Contents

The Four Rebellions and Their Physical Settings
2
The Telengana RebellionIndia 194651
8
The Mau Mau RebellionKenya 19521956
13
The Kwilu RebellionZaire 19631965
17
Geographic Marginality
22
Natural Disaster and Collective Political Violence
24
Land Scarcity Ownership and the Subsistence Ethic
25
The Bases for Collective Political Violence
30
Aspiration Denied
158
Incumbent Response and the Actualization of Violence
167
Imperial Ineptitude and Power Deflation
174
Village Initiation and Landlord Response
179
Nationalist Agitation or Incumbent Provocation?
183
Military Indiscipline and Public Discontent
192
Leaders Organizations and the Coordination of Dissent
198
The God Worshippers and Other Organizational Types
203

Inequity and Social Strain
31
Collective Action and Social Structure
34
Bases of Inequality in Late Ching China
39
Communal and class perceptions of conflict
50
Kikuyu Clans and Communal Land Tenure
57
Economic Impetus to Ethnic Rebellion
64
Alien Rule and the Potential for Discontent
74
The Manchu Maintenance of Rural Control
88
British Paramountcy in Theory Muslim Dominance in Fact
95
Race Against Paramountcy
102
Service through Domination
113
THE POLITICIZATION OF DISCONTENT
121
The Sense of Relative Deprivation
124
The Uneven Nature of Rural Discontent
126
The Uneven Nature of Politicization
129
Hakka Perceptions of Threats to Livelihood
133
The Intensification of Rural Indebtedness
137
Alienation of Land and Alienation of Support
146
Communal and Class Bases for Conflict
208
Constraints on African Political Expression
216
The Rewards of Opposition
227
Ideology and the Justification and Direction of Rebellion
236
How Christian? How Confucian?
241
Maoist Maladaptation?
251
Oaths and Basic Objectives
256
Muleles Redefinition of Maoism
262
REPRESSION AND RESURGENCE
273
Repression + Concession Termination?
276
Incorporation Reform and the Ebbing of Rebellion
286
Lessons from Malaya and the Loyalists Role
292
Ineffectual Repression Inept Pacification
301
The Continuity of Protest and the Significance of Politics
312
Notes
334
Bibliography
367
Index
379
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