Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and a Reconciliation

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Random House Publishing Group, Mar 29, 2022 - Biography & Autobiography - 400 pages
“Extraordinary and wide-ranging . . . a literary feat that simultaneously builds and excavates identity.”—The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)
 
Roxane Gay’s Audacious Book Club Pick • An acclaimed writer goes searching for the truth about her wildly unconventional Southern family—and finds that our obsession with ancestors opens up new ways of seeing ourselves—in this “brilliant mix of personal memoir and cultural observation” (The Boston Globe).

Maud Newton’s ancestors have vexed and fascinated her since she was a girl. Her mother’s father, who came of age in Texas during the Great Depression, was said to have married thirteen times and been shot by one of his wives. Her mother’s grandfather killed a man with a hay hook and died in an institution. Mental illness and religious fanaticism percolated through Maud’s maternal lines back to an ancestor accused of being a witch in Puritan-era Massachusetts. Maud’s father, an aerospace engineer turned lawyer, was an educated man who extolled the virtues of slavery and obsessed over the “purity” of his family bloodline, which he traced back to the Revolutionary War. He tried in vain to control Maud’s mother, a whirlwind of charisma and passion given to feverish projects: thirty rescue cats, and a church in the family’s living room where she performed exorcisms.

Her parents’ divorce, when it came, was a relief. Still, her position at the intersection of her family bloodlines inspired in Newton inspired an anxiety that she could not shake, a fear that she would replicate their damage. She saw similar anxieties in the lives of friends, in the works of writers and artists she admired. As obsessive in her own way as her parents, Newton researched her genealogy—her grandfather’s marriages, the accused witch, her ancestors’ roles in slavery and genocide—and sought family secrets through her DNA. But immersed in census archives and cousin matches, she yearned for deeper truths. Her journey took her into the realms of genetics, epigenetics, and the debates over intergenerational trauma. She mulled over modernity’s dismissal of ancestors along with psychoanalytic and spiritual traditions that center them.

Searching, moving, and inspiring, Ancestor Trouble is one writer’s attempt to use genealogy—a once-niche hobby that has grown into a multi-billion-dollar industry—to expose the secrets and contradictions of her own ancestors, and to argue for the transformational possibilities that reckoning with our ancestors offers all of us.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - spinsterrevival - LibraryThing

I love books like this that mix memoir with research. The author as well as her family members all have troubling histories, and she has spent much time to learn more and come to terms with it all. This had me thinking about my family genealogy and what my own ancestor trouble may be. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lisapeet - LibraryThing

This is a fabulously structured French braid of a book, deftly bringing together many lines of inquiry: stories of Maud Newton’s eccentric family, apocryphal and researched; her interest in genealogy ... Read full review

Contents

A Doorway
3
Like a Lenticular Print
19
Skeletons and Magnolias
33
Family Secrets
40
A Universal Family Tree
55
Taking a Bite
64
PART THREE NATURE AND NURTURE
69
It Skips a Generation
71
PART SIX INHERITANCE
199
Heirlooms and Disinheritance
201
Monstrous Bequests
214
Not Racist
226
Disconnection
233
Unacknowledged Remains
246
PART SEVEN SPIRITUALITY
251
The Witch
253

An Impulse to Leap
88
The Idea of Heredity
99
Genes Expressing Themselves 12
112
PART FOUR PHYSICALITY
123
Grandmas Eyes I 25
125
The Family Face
138
Mugshots from DNA
148
PART FIVE TEMPERAMENT
155
Grudging Kinship
157
Chasing the Dream
169
Emotional Recurrences
184
Generational Curses
262
Veneration
272
Lineage Repair
283
PART EIGHT CREATIVITY
297
The Nan
299
Beneficial and Malignant Creativity
310
Roots
321
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
325
NOTES
331
INDEX
365
Copyright

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About the author (2022)

Maud Newton has written for The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, The New York Times Book Review, and Oxford American. She grew up in Miami and graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in English and law.

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