Ancient Architecture of the Southwest

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University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 1994 - Architecture - 301 pages
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During more than a thousand years before Europeans arrived in 1540, the native peoples of what is now the southwestern United States and northern Mexico developed an architecture of rich diversity and beauty that harmonized well with the sweeping landscapes of mountains and deserts in which they lived. Vestiges of thousands of these dwellings and villages still remain, in locations ranging from Colorado in the north to Chihuahua in the south and from Nevada in the west to eastern New Mexico - a geographical area of some 300,000 square miles.
This study presents the most comprehensive architectural survey of the region currently available. Professionally rendered drawings comparatively analyze 132 sites by means of standardized 100-foot grids with uniform orientations. Reconstructed plans with shadows representing vertical heights suggest the original appearances of many structures that are now in ruins or no longer exist, while concise texts place them in context.
Organized in five chronological sections, the book examines architectural evolution from humble pit houses to sophisticated, multistory pueblos. The sections explore concurrent Mogollon, Hohokam, and Anasazi developments, as well as those in the Salado, Sinagua, Virgin River, Kayenta, and other areas, and compare their architecture to contemporary developments in parts of eastern North America and Mesoamerica. The book concludes with a discussion of changes in Native American architecture in response to European influences.
Written for a general audience, the book holds obvious appeal for all students of native Southwestern cultures, as well as for everyone interested in origins in architecture. In particular, it should encourage younger Native American architects to value their rich cultural heritage and to respond as creatively to the challenges of the future as their ancestors did to those of the past.
 

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Ancient architecture of the Southwest

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Like his Prehistoric Architecture in Micronesia (Univ. of Texas Pr., 1988), Morgan's new book on the development of Native American architecture in the Southwest (including parts of northern Mexico ... Read full review

Contents

TO a d 900
5
Mogollon
27
Hohokam
37
San Juan Basin Anasazi
59
Northern San Juan Anasazi
78
Virgin and Kayenta Anasazi
92
Mogollon
103
Salado
114
Rio Qrande Anasazi
205
Otowi
207
Long House
209
Tyuonyi
211
Poshuouinge
213
Sapawe
215
Arroyo Hondo
219
San Cristdbal
222

Sinagua
129
TO 1840
133
San Juan Anasazi
139
Rio Grande Anasazi
147
Mogollon
160
Grasshopper
163
Casa Malpais
165
Paquime
167
Cave of Las Ventanas
172
Hohokam
173
Los Muertos
175
Salado
183
Tonto
184
Cline Terrace
185
Schoolhouse Point
188
BeshBaGowah
189
Zuni Anasazi
192
Hawikuh
193
Hop Anasazi
195
Chukubi
198
Fire House
200
Sinagua
201
Pecos
226
Arrowhead
229
Gran Quivira
230
HISTORIC PUEBLOS 1540 TO PRESENT
233
Zuni
238
Lower Pescado
242
Nutria
244
Hop
245
Sichomovi
246
Hano
247
Shongopavi
249
Shipaulovi
250
Mishongnovi
251
Payupki
253
Rio Grande
254
Santo Domingo
260
OVERVIEW
265
GLOSSARY
267
PRONUNCIATION GUIDE
271
BIBLIOGRAPHY
273
INDEX
287
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

William N. Morgan is a practicing architect in Atlantic Beach, Florida, whose work has long been inspired by the design principles of ancient architecture.

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