Ancient Archives and Archival Traditions: Concepts of Record-keeping in the Ancient World

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Maria Brosius
Oxford University Press, 2003 - History - 362 pages
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Our oldest archival records originate from the Near East. Systems of archival record-keeping developed over several millennia in Mesopotamia before spreading to Egypt, the Mycenean world, and the Persian empire, and continuing through the Hellenistic and Seleucid periods. Yet we know littleabout the way archival practices were established, transmitted, modified, and adapted by other civilizations. This interdisciplinary volume offers a systematic approach to archival documents and to the societies which created them, addressing questions of formal aspects of creating, writing, andstoring ancient documents, and showing how archival systems were copied and adapted across a wide geographical area and an extensive period of time.
 

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Contents

Archival RecordKeeping at Ebla 2400235080
17
Archival Practices at Babylonia in the Third Millennium
37
The UrUtu Archive at Sippar
59
Archives of Old Assyrian Traders
78
Documents in Government under the Middle Assyrian
124
Local Differences in Arrangements of Ration Lists
139
Archives and Scribes and Information Hierarchy
153
Reflections on NeoAssyrian Archives
195
Aramaic Documents of the Assyrian and Achaemenid
230
Account and Journal Texts
264
Aspects
284
NonCuneiform
302
From Record to Monument
323
Tomoi Synkollesimoi
344
Index
360
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About the author (2003)


Maria Brosius is Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Newcastle

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