Anderson Anderson: architecture and construction

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Princeton Architectural Press, 2000 - Architecture - 191 pages
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Brothers Mark and Peter Anderson have been building things together since their boyhood days in Tacoma, Washington. Their work as architects, carpenters, builders, and general contractors encompasses the design and construction of residential, commercial, and public art projects. Anderson Anderson is noted for its highly customized work and its prefabricated systems for large-scale production. Informed by their experiences as carpenters and influenced by place and landscape—mud, clouds, and rain, in the case of the Pacific Northwest—the work of Mark and Peter Anderson highlights experimentation and adventure. Anderson Anderson: Architecture and Construction delves into the process of construction as a source of creative imagination and discovery—from the hands-on material process of making things, to the lessons learned from large-scale projects, to the development of new construction technologies. This book explores the simple beauty of their finished products as much as the process of getting there—the unglossed stories of young architects working, learning, traveling, and having fun. The book features over 25 projects in the Pacific Northwest, Hawaii, Alaska, Texas, and Japan.

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About the author (2000)

Journalist Mark Anderson has devoted more than a decade to researching the life of Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, publishing articles on de Vere in "Harpers," "The Boston Globe," and on He has also been a contributing writer for "Wired,

Peter Anderson is an experienced photographer. He has worked for various publications such as Gardens illustrated and Architectural Digest.

Lyndon, Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, has served as Chair of the Departments of Architecture at Berkeley, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Oregon.

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