Andy Catlett: Early Travels

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ReadHowYouWant.com, 2010 - Fiction - 168 pages
2 Reviews
Andy Catlett is the latest installment in Wendell Berrys Port William series, a distinct set of stories that Berry has been telling now for 50 years. Set during the Christmas of 1943, nine-year-old Andy Catlett sets off to visit his grandparents in Port William by bus, by himself for the first time. For Andy this is a rite of passage, his first step into manhood. His experiences on this solitary voyage become pivotal points in the entire Port William epic. The old ways are in retreat, modern life is crowding everything in its path, and as Andy looks back many years later, he hears the stories again of his neighbors and friends. A beautiful short novel, now in paperback, Andy Catlett is a perfect introduction to the whole world of Port William, and will be a rich new installment for those already familiar with this unfolding story.
 

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Review: Andy Catlett: Early Travels

User Review  - Vickie - Goodreads

Another great Wendell Berry book. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
22
Section 2
25
Section 3
38
Section 4
49
Section 5
54
Section 6
66
Section 7
71
Section 8
84
Section 12
116
Section 13
117
Section 14
129
Section 15
130
Section 16
140
Section 17
147
Section 18
155
Section 19
159

Section 9
100
Section 10
105
Section 11
114
Section 20
160
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Wendell Berry The prolific poet, novelist, and essayist Wendell Berry is a fifth-generation native of north central Kentucky. Berry taught at Stanford University; traveled to Italy and France on a Guggenheim Fellowship; and taught at New York University and the University of Kentucky, Lexington, before moving to Henry County. Berry owns and operates Lanes Landing Farm, a small, hilly piece of property on the Kentucky River. He embraced full-time farming as a career, using horses and organic methods to tend the land. Harmony with nature in general, and the farming tradition in particular, is a central theme of Berry's diverse work. As a poet, Berry gained popularity within the literary community. Collected Poems, 1957-1982, was particularly well-received. Novels and short stories set in Port William, a fictional town paralleling his real-life home town of Port Royal further established his literary reputation. The Memory of Old Jack, Berry's third novel, received Chicago's Friends of American Writers Award for 1975. Berry reached his broadest audience and attained his greatest popular acclaim through his essays. The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture is a springboard for contemporary environmental concerns. In his life as well as his art, Berry has advocated a responsible, contextual relationship with individuals in a local, agrarian economy.

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