Andy Warhol: Pioneer of Pop Art

Front Cover
Enslow Publishers, 2001 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 112 pages
0 Reviews
-- Describes the lives and achievements of influential 20th-century American personalities.
-- Appealing biographies of famous men and women written for teens.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Can of Soup
Pittsburgh
The Prince of Pop C 39
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Ford has been writing professionally for more than twenty years. She has worked as a newspaper reporter and has had short stories published national and international magazines. She lives on the East Coast with her husband, Bob, their three children, a cat, and a dog.

Born near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, of immigrant Czech parents, American artist Andy Warhol studied art at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh. He then worked as a commercial artist in New York City. In the early 1960s, Warhol became the most famous pioneer of "pop art," which used comic books, advertisements, and consumer goods as subject matter. Warhol's colorful paintings of Campbell's soup can labels, boxes of Brillo pads, and celebrity icons such as Marilyn Monroe, became among the most recognizable examples of pop art. Warhol was also a filmmaker as well as a painter and graphic artist; his more memorable films include Trash (1969) and Frankenstein (1973). His studio, called "The Factory," became infamous as a locale for eccentrics and eccentric behavior, much of it associated with the New York drug scene. It was Warhol who predicted that, "in the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.

Bibliographic information