Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2010 - Art - 175 pages
In the summer of 1962, Andy Warhol unveiled 32 Soup Cans in his first solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles--and sent the art world reeling. The responses ran from incredulity to outrage; the poet Taylor Mead described the exhibition as "a brilliant slap in the face to America.” The exhibition put Warhol on the map--and transformed American culture forever. Almost single-handedly, Warhol collapsed the centuries-old distinction between "high” and "low” culture, and created a new and radically modern aesthetic.

In Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World, the dazzlingly versatile critic Gary Indiana tells the story of the genesis and impact of this iconic work of art. With energy, wit, and tremendous perspicacity, Indiana recovers the exhilaration and controversy of the Pop Art Revolution and the brilliant, tormented, and profoundly narcissistic figure at its vanguard.

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ANDY WARHOL AND THE CAN THAT SOLD THE WORLD

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Incisive look at how Warhol's iconic Soup Cans paintings sparked the Pop Art movement, bringing American artists—Warhol especially—to the forefront of artistic and sociological discourse.Prolific ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter One The Boy on the Hill
3
Chapter Two Leap of Fate
19
Surfs
61
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Gary Indiana--novelist, playwright, actor, art critic, film historian--is one of the most supple and imaginative figures in contemporary American culture. He is the author of numerous plays, novels, and works of nonfiction, including Horse Crazy, Rent Boy, and Utopia’s Debris. Formerly the chief art critic for the Village Voice, Indiana has also written for the Los Angeles Times Book Review, New York magazine, Artforum, and the London Review of Books. He lives in New York City.

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