Anecdotes of a Life on the Ocean: Being a Portion of the Experiences of Twenty-seven Years' Service in Many Parts of the World

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John Lovell, 1871 - Seafaring life - 198 pages
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Page ii - Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand...
Page 136 - The store operates six days a week from seven to eight in the morning and from four to eight in the evening.
Page 190 - ... easily found by the needle pointing north and south. In certain parts of the world, however, the needle does not point to the north, but is drawn considerably to the right or left of true north. This is called the variation of the compass, and must be known accurately by the navigator in order to correct and steer the right course. For instance, in crossing the Atlantic Ocean, the variation of the compass amounts in sailing vessels to 2J or 2f points westerly, and the course steered must be corrected...
Page 191 - Australia is 21 points easterly, and, in order to make a due east course, it is necessary to steer 2| to the north, or left of her course ; while towards the equator there is hardly any perceptible variation of the compass at all. The best means of finding out how much the compass varies in different parts of the...
Page 191 - We have, however, in iron ships or steamers what is called the deviation of the compass to attend to, besides the variation. This is the local attraction caused by the iron, and must be carefully understood before steamers or iron ships attempt to go to sea. As in steamers of the...
Page 59 - At lengfh about the ninth week we managed to get fairly round, ie, to double Cape Horn, and keeping well off this much dreaded coast, were standing to the northward, under all sail, the warmth of the climate increasing day by day, until fairly within the limits of the south-east trades.
Page 76 - The mate now advised mo to heaveto, but calling his attention to her excellent steering and how well she behaved, I said I could not think of heaving her to with a fair wind blowing, although it was such a hurricane...
Page 104 - Calling the native serang or boatswain, I ordered all hands to " up anchor." His pipe or whistle was soon heard shrill and loud over the decks, rousing up the sleepers with the long drawn call
Page 32 - Tents were at first pitched on the island, but some of the captains and mates who had made themselves obnoxious to the crews, were so cruelly ill-used by being pelted with stones and dead penguins from the tents that the commander of the...
Page 56 - ... out to us, which for a time put a glow within us, but after its effects had died away, we felt chilled and almost as cold as before. On one particularly cold night, a small sail called the main trisail had to be taken in ; it Was blowing a perfect...

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