Anecdotes of Some Distingushed Persons: Chiefly of the Present and Two Preceding Centuries, Volume 1

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1796 - Anecdotes
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Page 302 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean, and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar ; his hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish ; his...
Page 252 - In such sessions, ten hours long, there was much public eating, not only of confections, but of flesh and bread ; bottles of beer and wine going thick from mouth to mouth, without cups ; and all this in the King's eye : yea, many but turned their back, and — (Good Heavens!) — through the forms they sat on.
Page 302 - ... at the latter end of the day, finding me ever incorrigible, and having some inducements to suspect me a tamperer, he was sufficiently rigid. The first time that ever I took notice of him was in the very beginning of the Parliament held in November 1640, when I vainly thought myself a courtly young gentleman ; for we courtiers valued ourselves much upon our good clothes. I came one morning into the House well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled,...
Page 249 - In the midst of it was erected a stage, like to that prepared for our Assembly at Glasgow, but much larger ; taking up the breadth of the whole house from wall to wall, and of the length more than a third part.
Page 245 - His memory was great, and he made it greater by confiding in it. His elocution was very fluent, and it was a great part of his talent readily to reply, or freely to harangue upon any subject.
Page 203 - He was no plodder upon books, though he read much, and that with great judgment, and rejection of impertinences incident to many authors ; for he would ever interlace a moderate relaxation of his mind with his studies, as walking, or taking the air abroad in his coach, or...
Page 46 - Julio the second only excepted ; and in him he represented the reigning passion rather than the man. In painting he contented himself with a negative colour, and, as the painter of mankind, rejected all meretricious ornament. The fabric of St Peter, scattered into infinity of jarring parts by Bramante and his successors, he concentrated ; suspended the cupola, and, to the most complex, gave the air of the most simple of edifices.
Page 45 - His line is uniformly grand. Character and beauty were admitted only as far as they could be made subservient to grandeur.
Page 255 - King ; with speed he comes to the House; he calls rudely at the door; James Maxwell, Keeper of the Black Rod, opens ; his Lordship, with a proud glooming countenance, makes towards his place at the board head...
Page 51 - He is a prince of a most royal carriage, and hath a princely heart ; and rather than he will miss or want any part of his will he will endanger the one half of his kingdom.

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