Anger Kills: Seventeen Strategies for Controlling the Hostility That Can Harm Your Health

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Harper Collins, Nov 4, 1998 - Self-Help - 368 pages
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Stop getting mad...and start saving your life!

Anger isn't just a negative emotion. It may also lead to heart disease and other life-threatening illnesses, according to the latest medical research. Now, Anger Kills helps you assess just how much hostility, cynicism, and aggression rule your life. Incorporating recent scientific data and the methods developed in the authors' anger-reduction workshops, this practical guide explains how to recognize anger points and control them using seventeen proven, successful strategies, from deflecting anger to improving relationships to adopting a more positive attitude. The authors also provide practical solutions for effectively dealing with hostile people to help you improve and diminish painful encounters and enjoy a calmer, happier life.

 

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Anger kills: seventeen strategies for controlling the hostility that can harm your health

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This clearly written book is a continuation and elaboration of Redford Williams's earlier work, The Trusting Heart (Times Bks., 1989), in which he described recent scientific evidence linking hostile ... Read full review

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Very insightful useful tips...looking to apply these simple strategies to my life.

Contents

at Risk?
3
THE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND
33
Reason with Yourself
100
Stop Hostile Thoughts Feelings
112
Distract Yourself
121
Meditate
127
Avoid Overstimulation
139
Assert Yourself
147
Increase Your Empathy
209
Be Tolerant
218
Forgive
233
Have a Confidant
240
Laugh at Yourself
250
Become More Religious
267
Pretend Today Is Your Last
277
PART IV
287

Care for a Pet
164
Listen
174
Practice Trusting Others
187
Take on Community Service
194
Your Last Act
303
INDEX
325
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About the author (1998)

Redford Williams, M.D., is director of behavioral research at Duke University Medical Center, professor of psychiatry, and associate professor of medicine. He interned at Yale University School of Medicine and did two years of research at the National Institutes of Health. He is the author of The Trusting Heart as well as dozens of scientific papers.

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