Angering in the Family: Using Choice Theory to Stop Controlling with Anger

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iUniverse, 2005 - Family & Relationships - 144 pages
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Angering, the chosen total behavior of acting out in anger, is experienced more frequently than other emotions. It lasts longer than other emotional states, produces a strong tendency to approach the person or situation toward which your angering is directed, and includes an experience of greater power than do the other emotions.

Communication difficulties increase when one individual insists they are right and the other is wrong. Choice Theory teaches that the problem with which one struggles is usually not a simple issue of right versus wrong. Angering often leads to verbal and physical aggression and decreased problem solving while nonangering total behavior leads to assertiveness and increased problem solving. In Angering in the Family, author J. Thomas Bellows, PhD, explores appropriate methods for relating to one's spouse, mate, child or other significant person in one's life. He also informs people that it is how they choose their total behavior regarding the person or event that leads to the choice to anger.

Learn how to come together with others instead of driving them away, and increase the happiness in your life. Angering in the Family discusses the various forms of angering that are found within the family and alternate ways to cope and reduce frustration.

About the Title-"Angering in the Family"

Choice Theory defines all behavior as being total behavior and states that it is designated by verbs named by the component that is most recognizable. Therefore, angering is the chosen total behavior of acting out anger.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Discussion
22
Anger Management
47
Helping Children Become AdultsParenting
57
Introduction
79
Using Mikes Story to Illustrate Group Reality
89
Group Solution
108
Conclusion
114
PARTIAL ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
117
Copyright

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