Anglo-American Securities Regulation: Cultural and Political Roots, 1690-1860

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Aug 22, 2002 - Business & Economics - 340 pages
0 Reviews
This book examines the regulation of the earliest securities markets in England and the United States, from their origins in the 1690s through the 1850s. Professor Banner argues that during the reign of Queen Anne a complex and moderately effective body of regulatory control was already extant, reflecting widespread Anglo-American attitudes toward securities speculation. He uses traditional legal materials as well as a broad range of nonlegal sources to show that securities regulation has a much longer ancestry than is often supposed.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

English attitudes toward securities trading at its inception 16901720
14
The South Sea Bubble and English law 17201722
41
English securities regulation in the eighteenth century
88
The development of American attitudes toward securities trading 17201792
122
American securities regulation 17891800
161
American attitudes toward securities trading 17921860
190
American securities regulation 18001860
222
Selfregulation by the New York brokers 17911860
250
Conclusion
281
Bibliography
290
Index
316
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information