Anglo-Saxon England

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OUP Oxford, Jun 7, 2001 - History - 765 pages
2 Reviews
'outstanding ... one of the most valuable contributions ever made to our knowledge of the history of our own land' English Historical Review This book covers the emergence of the earliest English kingdoms to the establishment of the Anglo-Norman monarchy in 1087. Professor Stenton examines the development of English society, from the growth of royal power to the establishment of feudalism after the Norman Conquest. He also describes the chief phases in the history of the Anglo-Saxon church, including the Conversion of the various English kingdoms, and the unification of Britain by the kings of Mercia and completed by the kings of Wessex. Drawing on many diverse examples-place-names, coins and charters, wills and pleas, archaeology, and the laws of the Anglo-Saxons-the result is a fascinating insight into this period of English history.
 

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This book is indispensable for the serious student of British early medieval history. Stenton's book is full of detail gleaned from many, many resources - truly a labor of love accomplished over ... Read full review

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1971 / n.p / 180 (3rd Edition)

Contents

Information preserved by Procopius
5
Hengestand Horsa belong to the history of Britain rather than
17
family
23
His victories ending in Fethanleag 584
29
Invaden not tribei under tribal kings but adventuren under leaders
37
never dominated by Mercia
50
the chief town of East Saxons in early seventh century
56
Ine succeeds
71
Cnuts elder brother king in Denmark but he allows Cnut to raise
387
The two kings come to an agreement but Edmund dies on 30 Novem
393
Nevertheless the professional clement through whom the country
395
Four expeditions to the north between 1019 and 1028
401
from other powers for English pilgrims
407
element in English society probably underestimated
413
Period after the death of Cnut an anticlimax
419
The episode of Swein son of Earl Godwine who seduced an abbess
429

thelfhth attacked by Britons from Lothian and Irish from Argyll
77
Oswald defeated and killed at Maserfelth by Penda who remains
83
Wulfhere not described as bretwalda brings all the southern English
85
THE CONVERSION OF THE ENGLISH PEOPLE
96
Gregory the Great and Augustines mission to the English fthel
103
Temporary conversion of Northumbria by Faulinus begun in 625
115
Cedd becomes bishop of the East Saxons
121
Christianity the dominant religion by 63 but traditions of heathen
128
Plague throughout Europe Wighard chosen as archbishop dies
130
At council at Rome in October 679 compromise attempted
137
Wilfrid again exiled by King Aldfrith because he claimed
143
Episcopal organization in England and the duties of the bishop Slow
147
rather than the English witen 155
155
men in Germany
161
LEARNING AND LITERATURE
177
Victory of the continental party in 663 meant that scholars in North
184
Mercian contribution to English learning undervalued in past
190
Qodmon and religious poetry
196
THE ASCENDANCY OF THE MERCIAN KINGS
202
Evidence of commercial relations with Frisia and Gaul
221
Succession of Cenwulf Appoints his brother Cuthred king in Kent
225
King Ceolwulf deposed and Beornwulf becomes king
231
At Claftshoh in 746 and Chelsea in 786 the clergy of the southern
237
Earliest raids on England
243
After a years fighting the West Saxons buy peace Alfred now king
250
Guthrum occupies East Anglia
257
Alfred remodels naval and military defences and builds fortresses
263
They are evidence of primitive township moots
267
His death 26 October 899
269
Alfreds laws
275
The Kentish system of land division
281
The kings fiorm or food rent baaed on the amount necessary
287
It appears first in Wessex and is made general south of the Tees as
293
The ordinance touching the hundred is of 94661 but such insti
299
Bookland an estate secured to its holder by book or royal charter
307
Rules in regard to oath helpers illustrate the declining influence
317
Battle of Tettenhall made possible the expansion of the West Saxon
323
In January 918 there remain the armies of Leicester Stamford
329
Before end of 918 the Welsh kings in west of Wales and the armies
330
Edward died 17 July 924 Athelstan crowned 4 September 925
339
alliance made with Hugh duke of the French who marries
345
Athelstans relations with Norway under Harold Fairhair
349
Episode of his brother Edwins death
355
Significance of the failure of Eric Bloodaxe
363
Coronation and anointing at Bath and symbolical rowing of
369
England in 1oo5 only to return the next year
381
The grant of Southwell to the see of York in 956
436
Continental strain less dominant in the decorative arts where
443
Oswald and Ethclwold transformed the cathedral chapters
451
The antimonastic reaction after Edgars death due to political
455
The advance of English learning accompanied by the spread of Chrie
462
ENGLAND BEFORE THE CONQUEST
470
The villtaMs of Domesday Book a vague word covering many grade s
477
Normans brought with them no clearcut scheme of social relation
479
St Oswalds leases for three lives much like services from gencatas
485
The movement towards a manoriaUzed society had gone further
491
over his estate and his men
497
In the Danelaw wapen takes elsewhere hundreds but in Kent
503
the ceorls 266 the thegns 2000 the mastthegn or priest
509
The sokemen of the Danelaw
515
The personal names and placenames in the northern Danelaw
519
TOWNS AND TRADE
525
By turn of tenth and eleventh century plots in a borough were often
531
The number of moneyers is at least an indication of the importance
537
The treaty between thelred and Olaf Tryggvason made in 991
541
Similarly lay public authority derived from the king that is
547
King Alfred asked the views of the witan before disposing of
553
Knight service in the duchy was not imposed aa a single operation
557
The king recalled Edward son of Edmund Ironside from Hungary
571
ford in 1056
573
Northumbria revolted against Tostig proclaimed him an outlaw
579
His marriage in or before 1053 to Matilda daughter of the count
585
undefended shore
591
Submission of Winchester and advance on London in a wide sweep
597
a second Northumbrian rising developed into a general war
603
Williams last years largely passed in warfare in northern France
609
Methods arranged by William for the government of England in
610
Cnut succeeded his brother as the king of Denmark and reasserted
617
William made serious attempt to govern through the Confessors
623
Honours and their composition
627
The Norman sheriffs generally strongest of the social and territorial
633
The curia regis or kings court was the central institution in the state
640
Royal finances were organized at an unexpectedly early date in England
643
The Domesday Inquest The articles put to the juries
653
In England he was equally ready to do as the pope wished in regard
659
Lanfrancs council of the church at Winchester in April 1o72
665
Battle and Lewes the only new foundations but gifts of land in Eng
673
EPILOGUE THE ANGLONORMAN STATE
680
The feudalism of postConquest society not the result of preConquesi
681
BIBLIOGRAPHY
688
KEY TO ANGLOSAXON PLACENAMES
731
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About the author (2001)


Sir Frank Stenton (1880-1967) was Professor of History at Reading University from 1926 to 1946 and its Vice-Chancellor from 1946 to 1950.

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