Animal Fables from Aesop

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David R. Godine Publisher, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 48 pages
2 Reviews
An illustrated adaptation of nine fables first told by the Greek slave Aesop.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AbigailAdams26 - LibraryThing

Barbara McClintock fans will rejoice at finding this collection of nine fables attributed to that classic moralizer, Aesop. Illustrated in her own distinctive style, described on the dust-jacket as ... Read full review

ANIMAL FABLES FROM AESOP

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Nine of the more familiar fables in gracefully phrased, slightly expanded versions that incorporate the morals in their amusing dialogue. Effectively employing a familiar framing device, McClintock ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Children's book author and illustrator Barbara McClintock was born in Clinton, New Jersey on May 6, 1955. She attended Jamestown College in North Dakota before moving to New York City on the recommendation of Maurice Sendak, whom she called to ask advice about how to become a children's book illustrator. She briefly studied at The Art Students League of New York. Before meeting Jim Henson and illustrating books for his television series Fraggle Rock, she designed characters for television commercials for an animation studio and illustrated textbooks. Her first book, The Heartaches of a French Cat, won the New York Times Best Books Award. She won this award three more times as well as a Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor award for Dahlia. Her other works include Animal Fables from Aesop, The Fantastic Drawings of Danielle, The Gingerbread Man, Adele and Simon, Mary and the Mouse, the Mouse and Mary, and The Battle of Luke and Longnose.

Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth. Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children.

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