Animal Farm

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 11, 2011 - Fiction - 110 pages

The animals of Manor Farm have revolted and taken over. Upon the death of Old Major, pigs Snowball and Napoleon lead a revolt against Mr. Jones, driving him from the farm. The animals embrace the Seven Commandments of Animalism and life carries on, but they learn that a farm ruled by animals looks more human than ever.

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User Review  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

I first read this in my early teens in the 1960s. Sadly, I didn't have the background knowledge at that time to appreciate the satire. Re-reading it now, with the necessary historical background in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nosborm - LibraryThing

A classic book I've finally read. Although it reads like anti communist propaganda it conveys its message well and even had me rooting for the characters. Shorter and lighter than I expected which might explain why it's so popular in schools. Read full review

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Contents

CONTENTS Chapter
Chapter
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
About the Author
About the Series Copyright About the Publisher

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About the author (2011)

ERIC ARTHUR BLAIR (1903–1950), better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist whose best-known works include the dystopian novel 1984 and the satirical novella Animal Farm. He is consistently ranked among the best English writers of the 20th century, and his writing has had a huge, lasting influence on contemporary culture. Several of his coined words have since entered the English language, and the word "Orwellian" is now used to describe totalitarian or authoritarian social practices.

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