Animal Mechanism: A Treatise on Terrestrial and Aėrial Locomotion

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1874 - Animal locomotion - 283 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 246 - The Principles of Mental Physiology. With their Applications to the Training and Discipline of the Mind, and the Study of its Morbid Conditions.
Page 239 - Series,' and a more attractive piece of work in the way of popular exposition upon a difficult subject has not appeared in a long time. It not only well sustains the character of the volumes with which it is associated, but its reproduction in European countries will be an honor to American science.
Page 241 - The author is at home in his subject, and presents his views in an almost singularly clear and satisfactory manner. . . . The volume is a valuable contribution to one of the most difficult, and at the same time one of the most important subjects of investigation at the present day.
Page ii - II. Physics and Politics ; or, Thoughts on the Application of the Principles of "Natural Selection " and " Inheritance
Page 245 - Our Place among Infinities: A Series of Essays contrasting our Little Abode in Space and Time with the Infinities Around us. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6s. The Expanse of Heaven : A Series of Essays on the Wonders of the Firmament.
Page 240 - Most persons claim to know how to walk, but few could explain the mechanical principles involved in this most ordinary transaction, and will be surprised that the movements of bipeds and quadrupeds, the darting and rushing motion of fish, and the erratic flight of the denizens of the air, are not only anoloeous, but can be reduced to similar formula.
Page 237 - Tyndall, was a model of lucid and attractive scientific exposition ; and now we have a second, by Mr. Walter Bagehot, which is not only very lucid and charming, but also original and suggestive in the highest degree. Nowhere since the publication of Sir Henry Maine's 'Ancient Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages.
Page 248 - IMPORTANT TO CLUBS. THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY will be supplied at reduced rates with any periodical published in this country. Any person remitting Twenty Dollars for four yearly subscriptions will receive an extra copy gratis, or five yearly subscriptions for $20. THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY and APPLETONS' JOURNAL (weekly), per annum, $8.oo l^j^' Payment, in all cases, must oe in advance.
Page 238 - The union of scientific and popular treatment in the composition of this work will afford an attraction to many readers who would have been indifferent to purely theoretical details. . . . Still his work abounds in information, much of which is of great value, and a part of which could not easily be obtained from other sources. Its interest is decidedly enhanced for students who demand both clearness and exactness of statement, by the profusion of well-executed woodcuts, diagrams, and tables, which...
Page 237 - Bagehot, which is not only very lucid and charming, but also original and suggestive in the highest degree. Nowhere since the publication of Sir Henry Maine's 'Ancient Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages. . . . To do justice to Mr. Bagehot's fertile book, would require a long article. With the best of intentions, we are conscious of having given but a sorry account of it in these brief paragraphs. But we hope we have said enough to commend...

Bibliographic information